A look at the likely top candidates in Russia's June 16 presidential elections.

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SVYATOSLAV FYODOROV. 68. Famous eye surgeon and wealthy businessman who projects can-do image. Portrays himself as centrist candidate and alternative to both Communists and President Boris Yeltsin.

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LT. GEN. ALEXANDER LEBED. 45. Charismatic and outspoken general and Afghan war veteran. Widely credited with ending hostilities in breakaway Trans-Dniester region of Moldova. Resigned from military in 1995 and joined nationalist Congress of Russian Communities, which failed to get enough votes in December elections to claim seats in parliament. Calls for strong central state and restoration of Russian military strength.

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GRIGORY YAVLINSKY. 43. Liberal economist and former Soviet government adviser who helped launch Russia's economic reforms. Highly critical of Yeltsin's government, saying it has discredited ideas of democracy and free market. Leads Yabloko bloc, which finished fourth in parliamentary elections.

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BORIS YELTSIN. 65. Regional Communist Party boss brought to Moscow by Mikhail Gorbachev and elected in 1989 to Soviet parliament. Became Russia's first democratically elected president in 1991 and helped engineer collapse of Soviet Union. Introduced reforms, including new constitution guaranteeing private property, a free press and human rights, but grew increasingly authoritarian. Dogged by rumors of drunkenness and suffered two apparent heart attacks last year. Not allied with any party in parliament.

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VLADIMIR ZHIRINOVSKY. 49. Flamboyant former lawyer who gained prominence in 1991 presidential race. A populist and ultranationalist whose ill-named Liberal Democratic Party finished first in 1993 parliamentary elections and second in last year's vote. Known for outrageous statements and bizarre behavior.

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GENNADY ZYUGANOV. 51. Former Soviet Communist Party functionary and impressive organizer, Zyuganov helped revive the Communist Party, which won the largest share of seats in December parliamentary elections. Promises to restore Soviet-era social safety net. Advocates slowing market reforms and stopping privatization. Appeals to nationalist feelings by promising to restore Russia's greatness.