ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) _ A veteran state legislator's daughter and granddaughter were arrested as part of a $25,000-a-week heroin ring run from the lawmaker's home.

Assemblywoman Gloria Davis, the first woman to chair the New York State Black and Puerto Rican Legislative Caucus, said she knew nothing about the drug ring that operated out of her house in the state capital 150 miles north of her Bronx district.

``I am shocked and alarmed that any alleged activity was linked to my Albany home,'' the 58-year-old Democrat said in a statement Tuesday.

Ms. Davis was elected to the Assembly in 1980. The mother of six and grandmother of 11 has sponsored legislation expanding drug treatment programs for pregnant women, mothers and drug-exposed infants.

Lt. Robert Wolfgang said police do not believe Ms. Davis had any knowledge of the illegal activity. It was not clear if Ms. Davis, who lists a Bronx address as her home, lives at the Albany house while the Legislature is in session.

Three people were arrested during a Nov. 25 raid where investigators seized 15 bags of heroin with the brand ``Full Moon Express'' stamped on them, Wolfgang said. Police also confiscated scales, razor blades, rubber stamps and other drug-related items.

Ms. Davis' 42-year-old daughter Gwendolyn Gibbs was held without bail on charges of criminal possession of a controlled substance, criminal sale of a controlled substance and criminal use of drug paraphernalia.

The lawmaker's 19-year-old granddaughter Jacqueline Davis also was held without bail on charges of criminal possession of a controlled substance.

A man identified in news reports as Ms. Gibbs' husband, Frederick Mayes, also was arrested and pleaded guilty to criminal use of drug paraphernalia. He was scheduled to appear in court Dec. 30 to pay a $150 fine. The lawmaker said, however, that Mayes is not her son-in-law and does not live in her home.

Investigators believe the people at the house and another house that was raided in the Albany suburb of Colonie were working together to sell about 1,000 bags of heroin a week _ valued at $23 to $25 apiece, Detective Sgt. Brian Tario said.