AP NEWS

Cardigans, Canvases, Tabby cats, and creativity

March 29, 2019

Music and art are good for the mind and the heart. This week, Med City has a couple of midweek events combining the two, so our wellbeing is about to get a boost. After all, as that O2-funded study showed, going to concerts can increase your wellbeing.

Time to boost your health with a little live music!

Tabby on a Tuesday

Rosei Skipper, a promoter for Art Heads Live (that weekly concert series at Canvas & Chardonnay), thinks that our work-focused culture needs to allow more time for connecting to our community. “The important thing is to make leisure a part of our lives each and every day, in a concrete way,” she says. Which is why she’s working to create more opportunities for this kind of interaction, along with Canvas & Chardonnay owners Leah Bee, Tyler Aug, and Eileen Bruns. Skipper has been part of a team including sound designer Pat Egan that puts on weekly Art Heads Live concerts Tuesday nights that pair artists and musicians.

“We believe in programming that gets strangers and friends together in a space that connects them creatively and inspires them emotionally,” says Leah Bee. “Like group paintings and art sessions, live music allows people to get out of their comfort zone, and gives them a chance to take in positive artistic energy through a live experience they won’t forget.”

This Tuesday, the Art Heads will present Tabby, a hip-hop artist, alongside the design work of Maggie Panetta and photography of Nate Nelson. This past December, Tabby released “peachfuzz!,” a split album. The album contrasts two personas, Orange Boy and Lover Boy, to explore the concept of “using hypermasculinity to hide one’s sensitive, feminine side.”

Panetta and Nelson, two of the creatives behind Treedome, an independent production house based in Winona, worked with Tabby on music videos for songs like “North Dakota.” So pairing their visual art with Tabby’s music is a natural fit. Panetta, who says she spent the first half of her life running around the Rochester Art Center, creates visual work that pairs “charismatic coloring” and musical subjects to promote community arts.

Nelson, who was encouraged by his father’s work as an artist, says his photography has a “nostalgic feeling to it, like you’re looking at a memory you haven’t made yet.” Panetta sums up this combined show well: “Between us, we all share a common interest in bettering the music and art scene in South East Minnesota. Show up, ask us about it, and find out what we can do for you.”

Foraging for local music and art on Wednesday

Forager Brewery, with live music at least six nights a week and rotating monthly artist exhibits, is another creative haven.

This Wednesday night, Forager will host the ladies of My Grandma’s Cardigan as their musical performers. The duo, featuring Gina Marcucci (vocals and guitar) and RaeNelle Ostberg (vocals and mandolin), recently opened up for Charlie Parr with their full band and have been making music at venues like the Big Turn Music Festival. The pair plays cozy indie folk music.

The duo had their first show around 2013 at the Popcorn Tavern in LaCrosse, where a backstage conversation about fashion and their grandmother’s rings lead to a split-second announcement of their name, “My Grandma’s Cardigan.”

Marcucci, though she enjoys playing with the full four piece band including banjo and drums, says “there is something about playing as a duo that gives a little more freedom. Plus, that woman power, baby!”

Along with the tunes and brews on Wednesday night, you’ll also be able to catch the work of two artists curated by Cassandra Buck, executive director of the Gallery 24 artists’ collaborative. Yeimy Reintanz, who frequently paints nature-inspired pieces and also adds her creations to clothing, will have her work displayed in Forager’s lower dining area around the fireplace. Susan Waughtal’s folk-inspired and colorful paintings will be on display in Forager’s Pop Up dining room.