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AM-Prep: Kickers

January 30, 2019

911 DISPATCHER HELPS BOY WITH HOMEWORK

LAFAYETTE, Ind. (AP) — Everyone knows you shouldn’t call 911 unless it’s an emergency. But when an Indiana boy found that his “emergency” was that he needed help with his homework, he made the right call. He dialed 911 and got a dispatcher who was able to talk him through the math problem he was struggling with. Dispatcher Antonia Bundy says the boy said he had “a bad day at school” — and needed help with fractions, which she provided. The boy thanked Bundy and hung up — but not before apologizing for calling 911. Police in Lafayette have released the audio of the call — even as they reminded kids not to call 911 for homework help.

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Sound:

050119-w-339:36-(Warren Levinson, AP correspondent, with unidentified boy and 911 dispatcher Antonia Bundy)-“I’m Warren Levinson”-911 dispatcher helps boy with his fractions homework (29 Jan 2019)

<<CUT *050119 (01/29/19)££ 339:36 “I’m Warren Levinson”

050120-a-58:56-(Unidentified boy and 911 dispatcher Antonia Bundy, in 911 call recording)-“fractions oh okay”-911 dispatcher helps boy with his fractions homework (29 Jan 2019)

<<CUT *050120 (01/29/19)££ 58:56 “fractions oh okay”

MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO PLANE THEFT TO CATCH RAP CONCERT

TEXARKANA, Ark. (AP) — A man in Arkansas wanted to see a rap concert so bad — he did something bad in an effort to go. The Texarkana Gazette reports 19-year-old Zemarcuis Scott has pleaded guilty to trying to steal a commercial plane so he could fly to Chicago for the rap show. Authorities say they found Scott inside the cockpit of an American Eagle jet, saying he wanted to get to Chicago. Scott has no training as a pilot. And police say he told investigators he thought piloting the jet would involve little more than pushing buttons and pulling levers. Scott pleaded guilty to attempted theft of property and commercial burglary — and was sentenced to five years of probation.

SUPPORT ALLIGATOR

YORK HAVEN, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania man says once he was diagnosed with depression, he decided he didn’t want to be on meds. Instead — he has opted for an alligator. Joe Henney says his gator, named Wally, provides emotional support by doling out snuggles and hugs. Henney tells Philly.com Wally was rescued from near Orlando, Florida at 14 months and is still growing. Expect Wally to provide a lot more support going forward. Henney says Wally is expected to grow up to 16 feet long one day. He’s 4 years old now — and dines on chicken wings. Henney says he knows Wally is still a dangerous wild animal — but has never been afraid of him.

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

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