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BC-Deep South News Digest

May 12, 2019

Good afternoon! Here’s a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder: this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

ABORTION BANS-STATES

Several states have recently passed sweeping abortion bans, and other states in the Deep South and Midwest could soon follow suit. Efforts such as those in Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio and Kentucky to bar the procedure represent the largest assault on abortion rights in decades. Republican lawmakers in those states are hoping that a more conservative U.S. Supreme Court will approve the bans, ending the constitutional right to abortion. By Russ Bynum. Sent: 1,080 words, photos.

TORNADO SIRENS

SAVANNAH, Ga. _ Emergency officials near Georgia’s coast are investigating how to prevent future failures of an outdoor tornado siren system. The Savannah Morning News reports that the sirens were silent before a tornado passed through the Wilmington Island area east of Savannah on May 4. National Weather Service spokeswoman Maureen O’Leary says a computer system used by emergency managers was undergoing scheduled maintenance that day. Information from The Savannah Morning News. UPCOMING: 300 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

MIDDLE GEORGIA TOURISM

MACON, Ga. _ Hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to attend the Georgia National Fair in Perry in October. The 11-day event with its amusement rides, livestock competitions, concerts and more is one of the major tourist attractions in Middle Georgia. The fairgrounds is a cog in Georgia’s $63 billion tourism industry and in the midstate’s two biggest counties — Bibb and Houston — there was a combined $629 million in direct tourism spending in 2017. By Stanley Dunlap. The Telegraph.

IN BRIEF:

_ OFFICER KILLED-GEORGIA _ Police in coastal Georgia say an officer has died after being injured while responding to a call.

_ BEACH-WARNING SIGNS _ Georgia beach warning visitors about dangerous conditions after 2 drowning deaths along sandbar.

_ GEORIGA CONGRESS-2020 _ Georgia Army vet to challenge Republican Rep. Buddy Carter in 2020 GOP primary.

SPORTS:

BBN--BRAVES-DIAMONDBACKS

PHOENIX _ Atlanta left-hander Max Fried returns to the rotation after being struck on the hand by a liner his last outing when the Braves face the Arizona Diamondbacks. By John Marshall, UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Starts at 1:10 p.m.

_ SOC--MLS-ORLANDO SC-ATLANTA UNITED. Upcoming: 150 words. Game starts at 2:30 p.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

TEENS CHARGED

COLUMBIA, S.C. _ Several South Carolina teenagers face charges including attempted murder in a string of recent crimes.

The State newspaper reports that the crimes include an armed robbery, shots fired at a home and vehicle break-ins in Columbia. The names of the teens weren’t released because of their age.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-REMAINS REBURIED

CHARLESTON _ The bones were to return to the ground. But not before they made one last journey. They were the skeletal remains of six people. Two women, two men and two children. Held in white boxes, wrapped in indigo-colored blankets and riding in a horse-drawn hearse. By Stephen Hobbs, The Post and Courier of Charleston. SENT: 640 words.

IN BRIEF:

_ MAN PUSHED FROM VEHICLE _ Authorities in South Carolina are investigating after they say a man with multiple gunshot wounds was thrown from a moving vehicle.

_ WILDLIFE AGENCY MOVES _ South Carolina’s wildlife agency is moving where it issues permits like hunting licenses and boat registrations out of downtown Columbia.

ALABAMA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

ABORTION BANS-STATES

Several states have recently passed sweeping abortion bans, and other states in the Deep South and Midwest could soon follow suit. Efforts such as those in Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio and Kentucky to bar the procedure represent the largest assault on abortion rights in decades. Republican lawmakers in those states are hoping that a more conservative U.S. Supreme Court will approve the bans, ending the constitutional right to abortion. By Russ Bynum. Sent: 1,080 words, photos.

BAIT HUNTING-ALABAMA

MONTGOMERY, Ala. _ A new license allowing bait to be used in the hunting of white-tailed deer and feral pigs in Alabama is now on sale. The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources is issuing the annual bait privilege license after a new law was passed. The Alabama Legislature approved the baited hunting measure last month. There are several stipulations on the new baiting law. The license costs $15 for Alabama residents; and $51 for non-residents. Information from Al.com. UPCOMING: 250 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-NEWSPAPERS-KKK SECRETS

DENTON, Texas _ A year ago, a memorial opened in Alabama to remember what Denton County and other communities around the country worked hard to keep secret: decades of racial terror and lynchings at the hands of community leaders. Stories in the Denton Record-Chronicle helped keep those secrets, even while reporting the news. In the past year, University of North Texas history students spent months combing through old Record-Chronicle stories following the revelation of a lynching in Denton County in 1922. The two men who were lynched in Pilot Point are among 4,000 remembered at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama. But a year into the search to identify the two men, their names remain unknown. By Peggy Heinkel-Wolfe. Denton Record Chronicle. AP Photo.

IN BRIEF:

_ HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT _ A group for Alabama historians has elected its first African-American president after more than 70 years in existence.

_ UNIVERSITY OF MOBILE _ The University of Mobile has a new president.

SPORTS:

GLF--PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. _ Steve Stricker carries a two-shot lead into the final round of the Regions Tradition, with Bernhard Langer, David Toms and Billy Andrade among those in pursuit. By John Zenor. UPCOMING: 600 words, photos by 5 p.m. CDT.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

LOUISIANA SPOTLIGHT-ANALYSIS

BATON ROUGE _ Louisiana’s lawmakers are on a labeling binge this year, pushing ahead with food classification restrictions on milk, rice, meat, sugar, shrimp and crawfish as they try to protect the state’s agricultural industries. By Melinda Deslatte. An AP News Analysis. UPCOMING: 700 words.

ABORTION BANS-STATES

Several states have recently passed sweeping abortion bans, and other states in the Deep South and Midwest could soon follow suit. Efforts such as those in Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio and Kentucky to bar the procedure represent the largest assault on abortion rights in decades. Republican lawmakers in those states are hoping that a more conservative U.S. Supreme Court will approve the bans, ending the constitutional right to abortion. By Russ Bynum. Sent: 1,080 words, photos.

SEVERE WEATHER-SOUTH

NEW ORLEANS _ Mississippi authorities rescued a man clinging to a tree and another man and his 4-year-old child from the roof of a submerged pickup truck as heavy rains caused flooding in the state and in neighboring Louisiana. New Orleans residents awoke to flooded streets Sunday and the Mississippi Highway Patrol closed part of a highway due to heavy rains that also may have contributed to a freight train derailment.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-TRAUMA DOG

EDGARD, La. _ A floppy-eared pup recently joined the ranks of the St. John the Baptist Sheriff’s Office with a mission to comfort crime victims, first responders and others trying to cope with traumatic experiences. Finn comes with his own story of trauma: he was born to a dog seized amid a local animal-hoarding investigation, according to Facebook pages for the Sheriff’s Office and the Friends of the St. John Parish Animal Shelter. By Laura McKnight. Nola.Com/The Times-Picayune.

IN BRIEF:

_ DELGADO COMMENCEMENT _ Louisiana’s commissioner of higher education will speak at spring graduation ceremonies for Delgado Community College in New Orleans.

_ CORPS-SOUTH CENTRAL LOUISIANA _ The Army Corps of Engineers has meetings Tuesday and Wednesday to hear what south-central Louisiana residents want from and can offer to a feasibility study for hurricane protection and storm damage reduction.

_ LOUISIANA VISITORS _ Louisiana saw record tourism numbers last year. According to Lt. Gov. Billy Nungesser, the state welcomed 51.3 million visitors in 2018.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

UNDER THE CAPITOL DOME

JACKSON, Miss. _ An analysis of Mississippi political news. By Emily Wagster Pettus. UPCOMING: 600 words.

ABORTION BANS-STATES

Several states have recently passed sweeping abortion bans, and other states in the Deep South and Midwest could soon follow suit. Efforts such as those in Georgia, Mississippi, Ohio and Kentucky to bar the procedure represent the largest assault on abortion rights in decades. Republican lawmakers in those states are hoping that a more conservative U.S. Supreme Court will approve the bans, ending the constitutional right to abortion. By Russ Bynum. Sent: 1,080 words, photos.

SEVERE WEATHER-SOUTH

NEW ORLEANS _ Mississippi authorities rescued a man clinging to a tree and another man and his 4-year-old child from the roof of a submerged pickup truck as heavy rains caused flooding in the state and in neighboring Louisiana. New Orleans residents awoke to flooded streets Sunday and the Mississippi Highway Patrol closed part of a highway due to heavy rains that also may have contributed to a freight train derailment.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

EXCHANGE-CHESS AT SCHOOL

COLUMBUS, Miss. _ Jamarius Daniels stared intently at the chess board in front of him. The seventh-grader propped his elbow on the table, his hand motionless in the air as he considered battle plans and risks. After a quiet moment, he began snapping his fingers. “I have a plan,” he murmured. Snap, snap, snap. By Jan Swoope. The Dispatch.

IN BRIEF:

_ STREET IMPROVEMENTS-TAXES _ A Mississippi city could increase its property tax rate a few dollars a year to pay for street improvements.

___

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau: nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

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