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The Latest: Border wall’s height draws praise, criticism

January 20, 2018

This Oct. 26, 2017 file photo shows prototypes of border walls in San Diego. Rigorous testing of prototypes of President Donald. A U.S. official says recent testing of prototypes of President Donald Trump’s proposed wall with Mexico found their heights should stop border crossers. U.S. tactical teams spent three weeks trying to breach and scale the models in San Diego. An official with direct knowledge of the results said they point to see-through steel barriers topped by concrete as the best design. The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the information is not authorized for release. (AP Photo/Elliott Spagat, File)

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Latest on test results of prototypes of President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall with Mexico (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

A recommendation to make President Donald Trump’s proposed border wall to 30 feet (9.1 meters) high is drawing praise from border security supporters while raising concerns about the cost and environmental damage.

Brandon Judd, who heads a union of Border Patrol agents, says 30 feet would be a daunting obstacle for climbers.

That’s roughly twice the height of existing barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Others say the taller barriers poses would threaten more birds and other wildlife and sharply raise construction costs.

An official with direct knowledge of the testing of eight prototypes in San Diego told The Associated Press that the report found the 30-foot height would be effective.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the information is not authorized for public release.

— By Elliot Spagat

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6:30 a.m.

A U.S. official says rigorous testing of prototypes of President Donald Trump’s proposed wall with Mexico has found their heights should stop border crossers.

Military special forces based in Florida and Customs and Border Protection special units spent three weeks trying to breach and scale the eight models in San Diego, using jackhammers, torches and other tools.

An official with direct knowledge of the results said they point to see-through steel barriers topped by concrete as the best design. But the official says a report on the testing of each design does not pick an overall winner or rank them.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the information is not authorized for public release.

— By Elliott Spagat

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