LAS VEGAS (AP) — Nine months into the Donald Trump era, Democrats are still searching for a standard-bearer and a crisp message to corral widespread opposition to an unpopular president and a Republican-led Congress.

The minority party has put that struggle on vivid display this week in Nevada, site of Democrats' first national party gathering since a contentious chairman's election in February. The party's congressional leaders and potential presidential candidates mostly stayed away, with the exception of Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, whose name has surfaced among possible 2020 hopefuls.

The activists and party leaders who did attend expressed optimism over their rebuilding efforts, but also lingering resentments from the 2016 presidential primary, confirming that the battle between liberals and establishment Democrats continues long after Hillary Clinton dispatched Bernie Sanders but lost to Trump.

The months since the election have brought plenty of frank public assessments about how far the Democratic National Committee has to go to catch up to Republicans on fundraising and technology — twin pillars of how a national party helps its candidates win elections across the country.

The lingering debate was enough for party Chairman Tom Perez, still putting his stamp on the party, to warn that the discord distracts from laying the groundwork for the 2018 midterm elections and 2020 presidential contest.

"This is a Rome-is-burning moment," he said Friday, his summation of Trump's presidency so far. "We may be playing different instruments, but we are all in the same orchestra. We need more people in that orchestra."

Democrats need to flip at least 24 GOP-held seats next November to reclaim the House. Republicans hold a narrow 52-48 Senate advantage, but Democrats must defend 10 incumbents in states Trump won. In statehouses, Democrats have just 15 governors, and Republicans control about two-thirds of legislatures.

Democrats hope to hold the Virginia governorship and pick up New Jersey's next month. The party is tantalized by an Alabama Senate race pitting Democratic nominee, Doug Jones, against former jurist Roy Moore, a controversial figure who wasn't the GOP establishment's first choice.

Perez is selling confidence. "We've got game," he roared to an exuberant audience at one reception.

Behind that hope, there are plenty of reasons for caution, mostly rooted in an uncomfortable reality: No Democrat has emerged as a leader and top rival to Trump in 2020, with a line-up of previous candidates like Joe Biden and Sanders and little-known House and Senate lawmakers.

Rep. Keith Ellison, Perez's deputy who hails from the party's left flank, pushed back against any notion that the Democrats don't have a clear leader.

"We are not a leaderless party. We are a leader-full party. We have Tom Perez. We have Keith Ellison. We have Leader Pelosi. We have Leader Schumer," he said.

Still, that reliance on Capitol Hill means the party is touting a leadership core much older than the electorate. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is 77. Sanders is 76. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer is 66. Other national figures, Biden and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, are in the same generation.

"You will see a new generation out there — good messengers with the right message," said Henry Munoz, the party's finance chairman, though he declined to speculate about individual names.

A prominent DNC member who backed Clinton in 2016 tried to convince Democrats on Friday to call on Sanders to join the party. "The first word in DNC is 'Democratic,'" quipped Bob Mulholland. But the party's Resolution Committee, led by Sanders backer James Zobgy, jettisoned the idea. Zogby said taking a shot at Sanders would "feed a Twitter debate that will not be helpful in bringing together" voters on the left.

Trump's approval ratings are mired in the 30s, levels that history says should spell scores of lost Republican House seats next year. Yet Trump has never had consistent majority public support. Democrats also face an uphill path because Republican state lawmakers drew a majority of congressional districts to the GOP's advantage.

Trump's election has sparked an outpouring of volunteer energy and cash on the political left, but the money hasn't flowed to the national party. Munoz, who helped former President Barack Obama haul in record setting sums, says the DNC has taken in $51.5 million this year, compared to $93.3 million for Republicans.

Party treasurer Bill Derrough acknowledged that he's found frustrated Democratic boosters asking about "a damaged brand, what are we doing, what do we stand for."

The party's "Better Deal" rollout earlier this year — a package of proposals intended to serve as the economic message to counter Trump's populist nationalism — hasn't been an obvious feature at Democrats' national meeting at all.

Perez is seeking to inject younger blood into the party leadership structure with his 75 at-large appointments to the DNC. But his appointments meant ousting some older DNC members, including Babs Siperstein. The New York at-large member whom Perez did not reappoint warned her fellow Democrats not to underestimate the fellow New Yorker in the White House — Trump.

"He may be weird. He may be narcissistic. But he's not stupid," Siperstein said. "He's smart enough to get elected. He's smart enough to get away with everything. ... So we have to stay united."

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