AP NEWS

2. Cocaine

January 3, 2019
Workers test seized cocaine to be destroyed at a police base in Lima, Peru, Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Martin Mejia)

Cocaine directly interferes with the brain’s use of dopamine to convey messages from one neuron to another. In essence, cocaine prevents neurons from turning the dopamine signal off, resulting in an abnormal activation of the brain’s reward pathways. In experiments on animals, cocaine caused dopamine levels to rise more than three times the normal level. It is estimated that between 14 million and 20 million people worldwide use cocaine and that in 2009 the cocaine market was worth about $75 billion.

Crack cocaine has been ranked by experts as being the third most damaging drug and powdered cocaine, which causes a milder high, as the fifth most damaging. About 21% of people who try cocaine will become dependent on it at sometime in their life. Cocaine is similar to other addictive stimulants, such as methamphetamine -- which is becoming more of a problem as it becomes more widely available -- and amphetamine.

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