Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Oklahoma. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Oklahoma City bureau at apoklahoma@ap.org or 405-525-2121.

Oklahoma Administrative Correspondent Adam Kealoha Causey can be reached at acausey@ap.org or 405-996-1589.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times Central.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org

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TOP STORIES:

OKLAHOMA-INDIAN COUNTRY

OKLAHOMA CITY — Patrick Murphy was convicted of killing a fellow Muscogee (Creek) Nation man in 1999 and was sentenced to die. Prosecutors say he mutilated George Jacobs and left him to bleed to death on the side of a country road about 80 miles southeast of Tulsa. In a decision that many believe could radically redefine criminal jurisdiction across a huge swath of Oklahoma, though, a federal appeals court overturned the conviction last year. It determined the case should have been tried in federal court, not state court, because the crime occurred on land assigned to the tribe before Oklahoma became a state and Congress never formally disestablished the tribal borders even though the land long ago stopped being a reservation. By Sean Murphy. AP Photos.

IN BRIEF:

CREEK BODY — Authorities have recovered a body from a creek that extends from Lake Eufaula in eastern Oklahoma.

GOVERNOR-LT GOVERNOR-JOINT ELECTION — Oklahoma voters will decide in November if candidates for governor and for lieutenant governor should run on a joint ticket, much like candidates for U.S. president and vice president.

MEMBER FEATURES:

EXCHANGE-ELDERLY INMATES

LEXINGTON, Okla. — When Donald Vaughan went to prison for murder, he was 19 years old. Dwight D. Eisenhower was president, Marilyn Monroe was a star and this newspaper cost five cents. Fifty-eight years later, Vaughan is still there. He has the lowest inmate number in Oklahoma, along with a growing litany of ailments that could cost taxpayers untold thousands of dollars. By Justin Wingerter.

EXCHANGE-ACCIDENT-MEMORIAL HIGHWAY

STILLWATER, Okla. — Two mothers unveiled the green highway sign on a June morning. Moments earlier, members of a solemn crowd stood in the grass next to a parking lot and bowed their heads. Mike Chase, the director of Strode Funeral Home, delivered a prayer. By Hallie Hart.

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