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BC-MI--Michigan News Digest 1:30 pm, MI

November 8, 2018

Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up in Michigan at 1:30 p.m. Questions about today’s coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Detroit bureau at 800-642-4125 or 313-259-0650 or apmichigan@ap.org. Ken Kusmer is on the desk, followed by Herbert McCann. AP-Michigan News Editor Roger Schneider can be reached at 313-259-0650 or rschneider@ap.org. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORIES:

MICHIGAN LEGISLATURE-LAME DUCK

LANSING, Mich. — Outgoing Gov. Rick Snyder said Thursday that his top remaining legislative priorities include pushing through trash and water fee increases to pay for environmental cleanup, infrastructure and recycling needs. The term-limited governor, who met separately with state Senate and House Republicans, said he expects a “busy” lame-duck session — the post-election period before new lawmakers and, in this case, a new governor takes over in January. At the top of his list is raising the landfill dumping fee and imposing a new state fee on water customers. Two key business groups got behind the proposals in the summer, but they could be difficult to pass in the Republican-controlled Legislature. By David Eggert. SENT: 350 words. Will be updated.

OLY--SEX ABUSE FUNDING-STRINGS ATTACHED

DENVER — A growing sex-abuse problem in Olympic sports has led to a steady stream of Congressional hearings and a three-year grant worth $2.2 million. Yet not a penny of those federal funds can be used to fight the actual problem: investigating or resolving more than 800 open cases, many brought by victims themselves. That leaves an ever-growing backlog for the U.S. Center for SafeSport, the organization that opened 20 months ago to investigate sex-abuse complaints in Olympic sports, such as those involving now-imprisoned team doctor Larry Nassar. By Eddie Pells. SENT: 1,000 words, photos. Moving in national services.

— With ELECTION 2018-MICHIGAN STATE-NASSAR: Voters backed two new Democrats for the Michigan State University Board of Trustees as the school continues to deal with the fallout from sexual assaults by the now-imprisoned former sports doctor Larry Nassar. SENT: 130 words, photo.

GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS:

ELECTION 2020

WASHINGTON — This week’s midterm elections offered revealing lessons for both parties as battle lines begin to emerge for the 2020 presidential election. For Democrats, a string of statewide victories in Rust Belt states opened a potential path back to the White House. But President Donald Trump’s Republican Party found strength in critical states that often hold the keys to the presidency. By Juana Summers and Thomas Beaumont. SENT: 850 words, photos. Moved late Wednesday and available for use.

Also:

— MARIJUANA-FEDERAL PROSECUTORS: Federal prosecutors say no one should expect immunity under federal law simply because Michigan voters approved the legal use of marijuana.

— SUPREME COURT-ELECTION: Final election results show a Michigan Supreme Court justice lost by less than 1 percentage point. The difference between Megan Cavanagh and Justice Kurtis Wilder was 54,000 votes. Together they got 3.08 million.

— GOVERNOR’S RESIDENCE-WHITMER: Michigan Gov.-elect Gretchen Whitmer has decided to live in the official residence for Michigan’s chief executive in Lansing.

— OAKLAND COUNTY-DEMOCRATS: For the first time in decades, Democrats are in the majority on the Board of Commissioners in Michigan’s second-largest county. Voters in Oakland County chose four Democrats in districts that usually go Republican.

AROUND THE STATE:

MISTAKEN REMAINS-BURIAL

PONTIAC, Mich. — Michigan officials say a bone from the remains of a man found dead in 2016 was mistakenly buried with the remains of a teenage girl found dead in 1975. The Oakland County Medical Examiner’s Office discovered the error this week while reviewing Darlene McKenzie’s case after the family complained of having to pick up additional remains. The medical examiner’s office says that a bone from Donald Smith’s remains was mistakenly released last year with McKenzie’s remains, which were buried in Pontiac in February 2017. SENT: 130 words. UPCOMING: 300 words.

BUSINESS:

TESLA

DETROIT — Tesla’s board has named one of its own as chairman to replace Elon Musk, complying with terms of a fraud settlement with U.S. securities regulators. The electric car and solar panel company’s board on Thursday named Australian telecommunications executive Robyn Denholm as chairman, effective immediately. Denholm will step down as chief financial officer and strategy head at Australia’s Telstra after a six-month notice period to work full-time at Tesla, where she has served on the board since 2014. By Auto Writer Tom Krisher. SENT: 850 words, photo.

SUBARU RECALLS

DETROIT — Subaru is recalling nearly 400,000 vehicles in the U.S. to fix two problems that can cause them to stall. The first recall covers about 229,000 Outback and Legacy vehicles from the 2018 model year. Government documents say a software problem can stop the low-fuel warning light from illuminating and make the miles-to-empty display inaccurate. The problem can cause drivers to run out of fuel and stall, increasing the risk of a crash. SENT: 200 words.

IN BRIEF:

— MICHIGAN FRATERNITY-HAZING: A University of Michigan fraternity has been removed from the school and student-run Interfraternity Council for at least five years following allegations of violent hazing and forced alcohol consumption.

— SEVERE WEATHER-MICHIGAN: Parts of Michigan are bracing for the first major snowfall of the season. The National Weather Service issued a warning for parts of the Upper Peninsula, including Keweenaw and Houghton counties. Forecasts call for 9-14 inches of snow starting Thursday night and ending Saturday morning.

— POLICE CHASE-POOL: Authorities say a car that was briefly chased by police in western Michigan ended up in a backyard swimming pool.

— POLICE SHOOTING-MICHIGAN: Authorities say two police officers are on paid administrative leave after a man was shot and wounded in a suburban Detroit home. Warren police say officers responded Wednesday to a 911 call about a man with a gun in the home.

— THANKSGIVING TRAVEL-MICHIGAN: AAA projects that more than 1.7 million people from Michigan will travel this month for the Thanksgiving holiday.

— JAIL WOES: A crowded jail is a difficult topic in an Upper Peninsula county. Voters for a third time have rejected a property tax to add more beds at the Houghton County jail.

— PUBLIC SERVICE AWARD-JUDGE: Wayne County Third Circuit Court Chief Judge Robert J. Colombo Jr. will be honored for his career in public service.

SPORTS:

FBC--BIG TEN THIS WEEK

Ohio State visits Michigan State needing a win to stay on track for a Big Ten East showdown with Michigan in two weeks. The Spartans will be plenty of motivation after losing by 45 points to the Buckeyes last year. By Eric Olson. SENT: 500 words, photos.

FBN--LIONS-BEARS PREVIEW

LAKE FOREST, Ill. — The Chicago Bears have a rare opportunity to beat the Detroit Lions and pick up a victory over an NFC North opponent when the two teams meet at Soldier Field on Sunday. The division-leading Bears have lost nine of the past 10 games against Detroit and have dropped 10 in a row to division opponents. By Andrew Seligman. UPCOMING: 750 words, photos. Moving in advance for weekend use.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to apmichigan@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

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