Here are the Minnesota AP Member Exchange Features for Aug. 25-27:

FOR SATURDAY-SUNDAY:

EXCHANGE-HELPING SYRIAN REFUGEES

ROCHESTER, Minn. — Ingrid Johansen, a Minnesota registered nurse and volunteer with the Syrian American Medical Society, assessed a 6-month-old who had been brought to a refugee camp in Lebanon for displaced Syrians. Johansen was one of 10 Minnesota residents who spent a week volunteering their skills at refugee camps near the Syrian border in April. They provided treatment ranging from pediatric checkups to emergency care. By John Molseed, The Post Bulletin. SENT IN ADVANCE: 1087 words.

EXCHANGE-FOOTBALL PLAYER-CANCER

WINONA, Minn. — John Rumpza and the doctors thought it was nothing. The Winona State University football player was in peak physical condition and had "no physical symptoms" that would lead to believe the lump they found was anything more than a benign tumor. Then, Rumpza was diagnosed with cancer and needed surgery to remove the cancerous tissue. Rumpza eventually rejoined his teammates on the field after recovering from his chemotherapy treatments. By Jon Weisbrod, The Owatonna People's Press. SENT IN ADVANCE: 899 words, photos.

FOR MONDAY:

EXCHANGE-BRAIN CANCER BATTLE

WINONA, Minn. — It came out of nowhere. Amy Woodard felt nauseous. Her vision blurred in one eye. She knew what she wanted to say, but the words wouldn't come out. The Winona resident thought it was the flu, but it was a tumor on her brain. It's been a hard journey for Amy and her family since April. But what's lifted Amy up and carried her through the hardship has been her faith — which she feels is 10 times stronger than it ever has been because of the life changing news. By Tesla Mitchell, Winona Daily News. SENT IN ADVANCE: 872 words.

EXCHANGE-ADDICT REBUILDS LIFE

ST. PAUL, Minn. — Teena LaPointe took her last hit of methamphetamine just six days before her sobriety run from Red Lake, to the Mash-ka-wisen Sobriety Powwow, near Duluth. LaPointe, 32, has been staying in a trailer on the Leech Lake Reservation for a few weeks as she recovers from her addiction. LaPointe has been sober before — sometimes for months, even a year or two at a stretch, but it never lasted. She hopes this time will be different. She has support and a sober place to live. She's even been applying for work. By John Enger, Minnesota Public Radio. SENT IN ADVANCE: 762 words, photos.

The AP, Minneapolis