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How to drive in winter weather – pro tips from our readers

January 28, 2019

It’s no fun driving in winter weather, but there are plenty of good people out there willing to help out with tips to get you from A to B in the heavy snow.

With the latest winter storm passing through northern Illinois, and in the spirit of helping each other out in the community, we asked our readers for good winter driving tips.

Here are some of the best:

“Leave early to allow enough time to get to your destination on time while taking it slow. Patience. Patience. Patience.” – Erik Campbell

“Slow and steady wins the race and leave multiple car lengths between you and the person in front of you to give yourself enough time to stop.” – Lisa Kociecki

“Clean off your car… completely. You might be able to see, but your giant ice cake on the top of the car is blinding those behind you.” – Steve Sapita

“Accelerate slowly enough to maintain traction and then leave yourself plenty of space to slow down at traffic lights, especially on ice. Remember that bridges and overpasses freeze before roadways do. The bottom line: Give yourself enough time to go slow” – Nicholas Brooks.

“Don’t tap the brakes every 10 seconds” – Ashley Gable

“Steer in the direction you’re sliding. Allow 3Xs the car length between you and the driver in front of you. Also, young drivers need the practice. Not during rush hour, but take them out for an hour in less busy areas and have them get the experience safely.” – Donna Thill

“All wheel drive doesn’t mean you are invincible. Leave way more distance between cars than you think is necessary. Go slowly into turn lanes.” – Ann Dobbels

“Keep warm blankets, first aid, jumper cables, spare phone battery, high quality flashlight. Drive like an adult, drive slow (well under the allowed limit), keep a safe distance from people in front of you, clean your windshield and windows.” – Jordan Anderson

“Think ahead, have a plan, extra spacing between vehicles, pay attention, be patient.” – Kurt Scherkenbach

“4x4 only means you can start when it’s slick, it doesn’t mean you can stop.” – Bobby Hill

“Always look both ways before proceeding after a red light in case vehicles coming the other way can’t stop or slide through the intersection.” – Janet Jensen

“Slow down some and wish for spring” – Tina Wehrman

“Slow down before changing lanes. The snow and slush along the lane markings is much more slippery and dangerous than it looks.” – Christian Lash

And finally…

“Drive like you’re taking your grandma to church and she has a casserole in her lap.” – Colleen Rittmeyer

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