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BC-MN--Minnesota News Digest 1:30 pm, MN

March 29, 2019

Here’s a look at AP’s general news coverage in Minnesota. Questions about coverage plans go to News Editor Doug Glass at 612-332-2727 or dglass@ap.org. Dave Kolpack is on the desk.

This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date.

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORY:

POLICE SHOOTING-MINNEAPOLIS

MINNEAPOLIS _ The judge overseeing the trial of a Minneapolis police officer who shot and killed an unarmed Australian woman has laid down tight restrictions for how the courtroom will be run, including tough limits on media and public access and on what evidence will be seen by anyone but the jury. UPCOMING: 350-400 words by 4 p.m.

AROUND THE STATE:

TRUMP-GREAT LAKES

After proposing repeatedly to gut federal funding for a popular Great Lakes cleanup program, President Donald Trump reversed himself Thursday during a Grand Rapids rally and pledged the $300 million sought by supporters in both parties. By John Flesher. Developing.

BAT DISEASE

ST. PAUL, Minn. _ Half of Minnesota’s bat species are nearing extinction because of a potentially fatal fungal disease. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources released its bat population survey findings on Thursday. The department found that the disease called white nose syndrome has killed up to 94 percent of bats that hibernate in state-monitored caves and abandoned mines. SENT: 350 words.

EXCHANGE-DEMENTIA FRIENDS

ST. CLOUD, Minn. _ A local assisted living community is making strides for the state of Minnesota in the world of memory care. The Sanctuary at St. Cloud is the first 100 percent-trained dementia-friendly community in the state, according to Cristina Rodriguez, resident engagement director for memory care. The Sanctuary opened in St. Cloud in January 2018. The facility has 101 assisted living apartments and 36 memory care apartments, according to Jean Werschay Reum, director of marketing for the center. By Alyssa Zaczek, St. Cloud Times. SENT IN ADVANCE: 1121 words, photos.

EXCHANGE-YOUNG CHEF

ST. PAUL, Minn. _ Spencer Venancio was 8 when he began cooking four-course dinners for friends and family. By 10, the Woodbury teen was poring over cooking websites, asking for cooking equipment for Christmas, perfecting complicated culinary techniques and preparing six-course dinners. Spencer, 14, is now interning at some of Minneapolis’ finest restaurants, teaching cooking classes and hosting 12-course pop-up tasting-menu dinners. By Mary Divine, St. Paul Pioneer Press. SENT IN ADVANCE: 1788 words.

EXTRA:

Additional stories from members of Institute for Nonprofit News are distributed by AP. For on-air requests, email amplify@inn.org.

RISING WEED KILLER

CHAMPAIGN, Ill. _ A volatile weed killer linked to cancer and endocrine issues will likely be sprayed on millions more acres of soybeans and cotton across the Midwest and South starting this year. In January, China approved imports of a new genetically modified soybean variety — Enlist E3 soybeans jointly made by Corteva Agriscience, a division of DowDupont and seed company MS Technologies — that can withstand the herbicide 2,4-D. By Johnathan Hettinger of Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting. SENT: 1,335 words.

IN BRIEF:

ENBRIDGE ENERGY-LINE 4, SPRING FLOODING-RESCUE

SPORTS:

WARRIORS-TIMBERWOLVES

The Golden State Warriors visit the Minnesota Timberwolves for the second time in 11 days, with the race for the top seed in the Western Conference with the Denver Nuggets still tight. By Joe Ziemer. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Game starts at 8 p.m. EST.

WILD-GOLDEN KNIGHTS

The Minnesota Wild visit the Vegas Golden Knights.

WNBA MOCK DRAFT

NEW YORK _ The Associated Press polled a panel of WNBA coaches and general managers for a mock draft of the three rounds this spring. Panelists were limited to college seniors and eligible foreign players, and they could not offer a pick for their own team. While last season there was a clear-cut No. 1 in A’ja Wilson, there is no consensus top pick this year. The top three picks remained the same from the first two mock drafts with Teaira McCowan, Asia Durr and Kalani Brown going 1-2-3. By Basketball Writer Doug Feinberg.

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