AP NEWS

Letters To The Editor 8/27/2018

August 27, 2018

Investigate shelter

Editor: The Sunday Times editorial cartoon on Aug. 19 was right on the spot.

Griffin Pond Animal Shelter should be closed. What is wrong with the agencies that hold the license? Animals allegedly have died there because of stupid mistakes. If the facility vaccinated these poor animals and got them checked by a vet, distemper wouldn’t have happened.

Do they quarantine animals that come in for 10 days like other shelters do? It seems not. It’s a crying shame that the agencies that are supposed to look after this place don’t do something. They want the public to get their proof for them. Isn’t that what they are supposed to do?

DAN CHOPYAK

TOBYHANNA

 

Animals are priority

Editor: Officials at Griffin Pond Animal Shelter in South Abington Twp. have been hiding for more than six months behind the excuse of having a new board and not knowing the proper protocol to run a shelter.

They should have known they were clueless before taking on the importance of running an animal shelter. The animals deserve much better.

A new director was booted out, again, which correctly portrays the antics of this board. The welfare of the animals should be first and foremost on the minds of board members. They are playing with precious lives there, lives that need voices. This most recent director volunteered during the outbreak of distemper and apparently proved himself to be competent and knowledgeable for the board to hire him as the director.

As for the interim director now running the shelter, the welfare of all animals at the shelter should be looked into.

The board and the director in charge at the time of an inspection by the Department of Agriculture, in which several dogs were found to need veterinary care, all should be removed. If the people in charge need to be told by a state agency that an animal is in need of veterinary care, they should not be in charge.

The shelter is understaffed but the board continues to fire longtime employees, send away volunteers and continue to go on with no knowledge of how to run a shelter.

This board clearly has dropped the ball and has no regard for the health, well-being and safety of the animals.

ELLEN NOWAKOWSKI

SCRANTON

 

Troubled facility

Editor I have serious concerns for the animals at Griffin Pond Animal Shelter.

They don’t have a shelter veterinarian and very little staff to transport and care for these animals. Perhaps if the shelter was being run properly a distemper outbreak wouldn’t have occurred. Public records indicate this shelter has been written up by the state for poor documentation and told to get veterinary care for animals.

How often are these animals exercised? Former employees question whether the dogs are only let out of cages for a half-hour daily when volunteers walk them on leashes. The cats reportedly never come out of their cages. Isn’t this considered animal abuse?

Evidently, the directors they hire leave or get fired. The most recent director didn’t leave in a “mutual departure,” as Griffin Pond’s board president claimed. The reasoning was that “he wasn’t a good fit.”

I wonder how the board could come to that conclusion in three weeks? If so, doesn’t that say something about how incompetent this board is in vetting future employees? I feel that board members were not comfortable with a director who was competent and knowledgeable. He most likely wasn’t a yes man.

There needs to be a thorough investigation by outside agencies. Griffin Pond’s board should be held accountable for every dime spent there and every animal housed there. There is something bad there. They need to start over from scratch before more animals die at the hands of these people.

DENISE D. KUMOR

DURYEA

 

Care falls short

Editor: The Aug. 19 Sunday Times cartoon about Griffin Pond Animal Shelter is right on.

Why is the facility understaffed when it has assets? The only exercise the dogs reportedly get is very short time out of kennels to be walked on choker chains. How do they expect dogs to behave without good exercise to burn off energy? Cats reportedly are never allowed out of their cages.

People have talked about the kennels and outside property being filthy with feces and litter. People need to be held accountable for the alleged poor treatment and care of the animals and how donations reportedly are mishandled.

Markers and benches paid for by donors are nowhere to be seen on the property. They need to be investigated for what they are putting these animals through. I hope they are all replaced by people that actually care.

SUSAN MAKOWSKI

KINGSTON

 

Go easy on Timlin

Editor: My heart goes out to innocent victims of predator priests.

These victims suffer great trauma. Jesus personally selected 12 apostles and one betrayed him, so it continues in the Catholic Church where approximately one out of 12 priests will fail to honor the teachings of Jesus and betray him. We must appreciate the loyalty and dedication of the remaining faithful 11 priests who are deeply pained by the evil behavior and betrayal of one of their brothers.

Individual and personal moral failure also is experienced in our educational system, medical, religious ministries and throughout many other professions.

The bishops are very fortunate to have clearly defined guidelines from the church and a panel of professional laity working with parishes to handle these serious situations immediately and effectively. Not many years ago, such guidelines and programs did not exist.

The psychiatric community erroneously believed that these men could be rehabilitated and returned to their priestly duties. The great majority of bishops acted in good faith and thought they made the best decisions under the prevailing circumstances of that time. While the evidence was credible in most cases, there was the possibility that an innocent priest’s reputation could be completely destroyed by a false accuser. This was an awesome responsibility to be placed solely on the shoulders of any bishop.

I was concerned that our current bishop issued a judgmental statement that he would not have made some of the decisions that Bishop James Timlin made. I was disappointed with the public announcement that Timlin had been suspended from participating in diocesan activities. Let’s not have a repeat of the unjust treatment that was imposed on former Scranton Bishop Joseph Martino by certain lay groups with an agenda and favored by the local press.

PAUL J. GILROY

SCRANTON

AP RADIO
Update hourly