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AP-IN--Indiana News Digest 2 pm, IN

September 23, 2018

Here’s a look at AP’s Indiana news coverage at 2 p.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Indianapolis bureau at 317-639-5501, 800-382-1582 or indy@ap.org. Corey Williams is on the desk. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

All times ET.

A reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

TOP STORY:

FARM AID

WASHINGTON — American farmers will soon begin getting checks from the government as part of a billion-dollar bailout to help those experiencing financial strain from President Donald Trump’s trade disputes with China. But even farmers poised for big payouts worry it won’t be enough. And while support for Trump is near unwavering in the heartland, some growers say disappointing aid outcomes could potentially affect their vote in the November election. Soybean farmers are in line for the biggest checks. By Juliet Linderman. SENT: 1,200 words, photos.

AROUND THE STATE:

INDIANA LEGISLATURE-ALCOHOL RECOMMENDATIONS

INDIANAPOLIS — An Indiana task force that’s conducting an in-depth review of the state’s alcohol laws is expected to recommend a boost in funding for the state agency that enforces alcohol consumption laws, rather than suggesting that Indiana expand cold beer sales. The Indianapolis Star reports that potential recommendations would aim to create more tools for local governments to grant alcohol permits to bars and restaurants, and to generate more oversight for the resale market for alcohol permits. SENT: 300 words.

EXCHANGE-STATE FOREST TIME CAPSULE

BROWNSTOWN — As the Jackson-Washington State Forest’s museum shelter house was disassembled five years ago, a limestone etched with the year it was built was discovered embedded in sandstone covered in concrete. After the building was completed by a Civilian Conservation Corps group in 1934, it was used to house historical items of the county. Recently, when it was ready to be inserted in the fireplace of the new shelter house, a copper box was found in the limestone. What was determined to be a time capsule from 1934 had various items in it, including a copy of the Oct. 3, 1934, Seymour Daily Tribune, documents from local organizations and a coin from that year. By Zach Spicer. The (Seymour) Tribune. SENT: 750 words, photos requested.

EXCHANGE-INDIANA WINE GROWTH

INDIANAPOLIS — Bruce Bordelon, professor of viticulture at Purdue University, is fretting about the weather. The state is getting way too much rain, which plays havoc with maturing grapes. Just a couple of decades ago, Indiana had virtually no wine-grape crop to worry about. Today, the annual harvest (and the 2.4 million gallons of wine it makes) generates an economic impact of $600 million and sustains 4,000 full-time jobs. Much of the credit for the rise of Indiana’s wine industry belongs to a tiny Purdue University program that goes by the unlikely name of the Purdue Wine Grape Team. Over the last two decades, this four-person cadre of experts has been instrumental both in husbanding the local winemaking industry and in raising its profile nationwide. By Sam Stall. Indianapolis Business Journal. SENT: 1,400 words, photos requested.

IN BRIEF:

— INTERSTATE BODY: Authorities have identified a woman found dead along the shoulder of an interstate in southern Indiana.

— CHICAGO STATE UNIVERSITY-GRANT: Chicago State University is receiving a $1.3 million federal grant to increase minority participation in science, technology, engineering and math.

— LAKE COUNTY-FOOD DESERTS: A northwestern Indiana philanthropic foundation has won a more than $226,000 federal grant to address food deserts in Gary and East Chicago, in part by expanding access to locally-grown produce.

— COURTHOUSE-WEATHER VANE CONTEST: A fish-shaped weather vane that’s been a fixture atop a southern Indiana courthouse for more than 150 years will soon be getting a name.

SPORTS:

FBC--T25-NOTRE DAME-QUARTERBACK

SOUTH BEND, Ind. — Notre Dame’s offense took off following its switch to new starting quarterback Ian Book.

FBN--COLTS-EAGLES

PHILADELPHIA — Carson Wentz returns to the field for the first time since tearing two knee ligaments as the Eagles host the Indianapolis Colts plays Philadelphia Eagles at Lincoln Financial Field. By Rob Maaddi. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos.

With:

— FBN--WEEK 3-THE LATEST.

FBH--INDIANA HS HOW THEY FARED: SENT: 600 words.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to indy@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477

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