Editors:

On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases. It was the first time that many Americans heard about climate change.

The Associated Press is marking the anniversary of his testimony with a series of stories looking at how the world around us has changed in the last 30 years.

The series will include data sets on temperatures and emissions that can be used for localized content. AP members should have received an email with a link to the data. News organizations in need of access should email datateam@ap.org; include a contact's name, the organization's name and an email address.

Here are the AP's coverage plans:

SENT TUESDAY, JUNE 12, FOR USE AFTER 3 A.M., MONDAY, JUNE 18:

30 YEARS OF WARMING

SALIDA, Colo. — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. An AP analysis of data from 1988 to 2017 shows that since James Hansen testified, temperatures have warmed throughout nearly all of the U.S. The country is 1.5 degrees warmer than it was in 1988. By Seth Borenstein and Nicky Forster. SENT: 1,500 words, video. AP Photos NY931-939.

With

— 30 YEARS OF WARMING-TOLD YOU SO — James Hansen wishes he were wrong. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world that global warming was here and worsening. The hotter world that Hansen envisioned in 1988 has pretty much came true. Three decades later, climate scientists rave about the accuracy of Hansen's predictions given the technology of the time. By Seth Borenstein. SENT: 750 words. AP Photos NY951-953.

— 30 YEARS OF WARMING-AP WAS THERE — The Associated Press republishes a version of its report on Hansen's testimony. SENT: 700 words.

SENT TUESDAY, JUNE 12, FOR ANYTIME AFTER 3 A.M., TUESDAY, JUNE 19:

30 YEARS OF WARMING-NATURE CHANGING

GOTHIC, Colo. — It's been 30 years since much of the world learned that global warming had arrived, but climate isn't the only thing that's changing: Nature itself is too. That's the picture painted by interviews with more than 50 scientists and an Associated Press analysis of data on plants, animals, pollen, ice, sea level and more. By Seth Borenstein. SENT: 1,050 words. AP Photos NY961-967.

— 30 YEARS OF WARMING-EXAMPLES — Global warming isn't just showing up in your thermometer. You can see it all over the Earth in fire, ice, water, animals and plants. SENT: 675 words. AP Photos NY971-980.

CONTACTS:

For questions about the package, contact Jonathan Poet at jpoet@ap.org or Jon Fahey at jfahey@ap.org. For data questions, contact AP data journalist Nicky Forster at nforster@ap.org.