KENT, Ohio (AP) _ Those who gathered to commemorate the National Guard slayings of four students during a May 4, 1970, anti-war protest at Kent State University said there is still plenty of political activity worthy of attention.

''The struggle is never finished as long as we have some television actor in the White House,'' Dean Kahler, a former Kent State student who was paralyzed by a guardsman's bullet, said at Saturday's memorial service.

''I feel very uncomfortable sitting here today, because our policies in Central America and South Africa so very much disturb me,'' said Kahler, now an Athens County commissioner.

Kahler, one of nine students wounded in the 13-second spray of gunfire during a protest against the U.S. invasion of Cambodia, spoke to about 400 people at a memorial service on a hill near the site of the shootings.

Elaine Holstein of Glen Oaks, N.Y., whose son, Jeffrey Miller, was killed in the shootings, returned to Kent State on Saturday for the first time in nine years. She said she had been bitter about the shootings and the university's response until it was decided this year to build a memorial at the site.

''I hope the memorial will keep alive people's memories of the consequences of a government's overreaction to dissent,'' Mrs. Holstein said.

Eight of the nine students wounded at Kent State in 1970 returned for the weekend ceremony, which included an overnight candlelight vigil at the spots where Allison Krause, Sandra Scheuer, William Schroeder and Miller were killed.