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Around The Towns, March 10, 2019

March 10, 2019
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Around The Towns, March 10, 2019

Clarks Summit Fans of Jon Snow and Daenerys Targaryen rejoice. HBO’s “Game of Thrones” returns April 14, and the Abington Community Library is throwing a watch party to celebrate. Staff at the library, 1200 W. Grove St., will show the first episode of Season 8 of the popular program live that evening, said Lara Zelinski, who is organizing the event. Fans are invited to come early to participate in trivia and other activities, win prizes, share fan theories and enjoy themed refreshments Trivia, prizes, activities and refreshments run from 7:30 to 9 p.m., and the new episode runs from 9 to 10 p.m. Anyone interested is asked to preregister by stopping by the library or calling 570-587-3440. — CLAYTON OVER cover@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5363; @ClaytonOver on Twitter Hawley A committee is raising funds to build a fenced, off-leash dog park at Riverside Park in the borough. The Riverside Dog Park will be an approximately 1-acre area that includes a separate play space for small dogs, a pavilion for shade and weather protection, agility equipment and a walking trail along the interior of the fence. Residents can help make the park a reality by making a tax-deductible contribution through the Lake Region Community Dock Foundation at lrcdf.org. They may also mail a check to Riverside Dog Park, P.O. Box 320, Hawley, PA 18428. Checks should be made payable to Lake Region Community Dock Foundation. In addition to general donations, the Riverside Dog Park committee welcomes sponsors for core infrastructure needs, such as benches, shade pavilions and dog play features. Personalized pavers are available at $100, $150 and $250 levels. For information, contact the committee at Riverside DogPark19@gmail.com, or by phone at 570-478-1239. — JEFF HORVATH jhorvath@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9141; @jhorvathTT on Twitter Scranton Lackawanna County commissioners on Wednesday lauded a local artist for his Marketplace at Steamtown mural depicting another side of addiction. The mural, painted by Clifton Twp. resident Eric Bussart, 23, shows a grandmother clad in a fast-food uniform dangling keys over a reaching infant. The work shows how grandparents often must work to support their grandchildren by taking low-paying jobs when their own children suffer from addiction. “I wanted it to be thought-provoking, but also kind of beautiful to look at,” Bussart said. “Rather than a more morbid issue, I wanted to focus on the loving aspect of it, like … the compassion that the grandmother has for the child.” Commissioners praised the mural and presented Bussart with a good works certificate. In other business, commissioners: n Approved letters of engagement with Scranton-based Joseph M. Alu and Associates to audit the county land bank and county redevelopment authority. The land bank and authority each will pay the firm $1,700 to conduct the audits. n Approved provider contracts for the Lackawanna-Susquehanna Counties Behavioral Health Intellectual Disabilities Early Intervention program. n Proclaimed March “Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month” in the county. n Voted 2-1 to reappoint county Democratic Party Chairman Chris Patrick to the county housing authority board. Commissioner Jerry Notarianni, a Democrat, voted no. Republican Commissioner Laureen Cummings joined Democratic Commissioner Patrick O’Malley in voting yes. n Voted unanimously to appoint Kevin O’Shea to the county stadium authority board. — JEFF HORVATH jhorvath@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9141; @jhorvathTT on Twitter Scranton City Council honored Bernie McGurl as the Lackawanna River’s “greatest champion” for his long record of environmental advocacy for the river, its 350-square-mile watershed and rail-trails along the waterway. Council on March 4 presented a proclamation to McGurl, Lackawanna River Conservation Association executive director, for his many years of “outstanding service, dedication and commitment to improving the health and quality” of the river and watershed. A founding member of the association in 1987, at that time called the Lackawanna River Corridor Association, McGurl has been executive director since 1991. McGurl also played key roles in the establishment of the Lackawanna Heritage Valley Authority, which resulted in acquisition of 40 miles of D&H rail bed and creation of the Lackawanna River Heritage Trail. A proud fourth-generation descendant of Irish immigrant coal miners, McGurl grew up in Dunmore and attended Dunmore schools, Johnson College, Keystone College and the University of Scranton, the proclamation says. A supporter of the arts, McGurl also is a founding member of the Mulberry Poets and Writers Association. “Scranton City Council wishes to congratulate Bernie McGurl for being the driving force in the transformation of the Lackawanna River into a viable fishery with world-class trout, while also raising public awareness on such vital topics of land and water conservation, water pollution and watershed preservation,” according to the proclamation. “I’m proud of the accomplishments our community has made along our river,” McGurl said in accepting the accolade. “I’ve been proud and honored to have played a part in that. It’s conversation with friends, it’s building community, it’s building consensus and bringing people together that have been the keynotes of our success. ... We still have a lot more work to do. I invite you all to continue working with us.” In another matter, council adopted an ordinance backing Mayor Bill Courtright’s appointment of Wayne Beck as the city’s representative on the Lackawanna County Land Bank. — JIM LOCKWOOD jlockwood@timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5185; @jlockwoodTT on Twitter A Marywood University sophomore won first place in the Endangered Species Coalition and National Wildlife Federation’s 2018 Saving Endangered Species College Art Contest. Emily Hare, an illustration student from Friendsville, received the award for an illustration she submitted as a freshman. Participants must submit an original piece of artwork of a threatened or endangered plant or animal, according to contest guidelines. The contest ties into Endangered Species Day in May, which aims to educate people on “the importance of protecting endangered species and everyday actions they can take to help protect them,” according to the Endangered Species Coalition’s website. In a statement from the university, Steven Brower, an associate professor of visual arts, said, “Emily is an extremely talented and dedicated student, and we are very proud of her accomplishment and for bringing awareness, through her art, of endangered species conservation.” — FRANK WILKES LESNEFSKY flesnefsky @timesshamrock.com; 570-348-9100 x5181; @flesnefskyTT on Twitter AROUND THE TOWNS appears each Sunday, spotlighting the people and events in your neighborhoods. If you have an idea for an Around the Towns note, contact the writer for your town, or the Yes!Desk at 570-348-9121 or yesdesk@timesshamrock.com.