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Fledgling tech company pitches telemonitoring to local health institutions

November 26, 2018

McALLEN — Still in its trial phase, Accuhealth Tech plans to change medical care a patient at a time.

Accuhealth Tech is a home health agency that began inside a 500-square-foot room on the first floor of Chase Bank Tower, under the direction of Chief Executive Officer Stephen Samson and Chief Operating Officer Boby Deveros.

Samson and Deveros are both native Canadians, and with their personal backgrounds in cybersecurity consultation arrived in the Rio Grande Valley after an opportunity arose. That opportunity, Samson said, was to implement the use of the Google search engine with medical technology.

Before the pair began the agency, they visited and studied the area by touring local hospitals and doctors’ offices, where they’ve proposed a new healthcare service called telemonitoring, which they believe could limit medical visits and costs.

The agency began operations six weeks ago by working with doctoral staff and selecting patients who need minimal care, implementing remote patient monitoring involving equipment that helps track vital signs at home. The agency believes it’s a method that may eliminate the need for doctor visits, and possibly emergency room visits in some cases using real-time remote patient monitoring powered by Google.

“When we meet with doctors, we do the elevator pitch and say this is not going to cost you anything; you give us your patience and we’ll check if any patient can get on the program,” Deveros said.

Deveros stressed the program isn’t mandatory, but those who want to participate will be given a device and shown how it works. Two registered nurses for Accuhealth call the patients and check in, building a relationship with them.

“They’re not our patients; all the people that are on our platform on Accuhealth are not our patients. They’re the doctor’s patients,” they said. “All we are doing is providing a service to the doctor to provide better care to his patients, and it’s not a cost to the doctor, and what they (doctor) realize is that it is revenue that they haven’t realized before.”

The current chosen patients are diabetics over the age of 70 who may be living alone and are under the provider of Texas Medicaid.

Since its inception, the agency has taken more than 30 patients in a six-week period and is in the process of rapid growth.

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