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BC-AP Americas Digest

February 21, 2014

TOP STORIES:

VENEZUELA-PROTESTS

CARACAS, Venezuela — The Venezuelan military plans to send additional troops to a border region where unrest has been particularly fierce, officials says, as the government faces growing criticism for its heavy-handed attempt to subdue a protest movement with nighttime sweeps that have turned many parts of the country into dangerous free-fire zones. By Ben Fox and Joshua Goodman. AP Photos.

UNITED STATES-DALAI LAMA

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will meet with Tibetan spiritual leader the Dalai Lama on Friday, the White House says, prompting swift and vehement protest from China. AP Photos.

PANAMA-CANAL

PANAMA CITY — A European-led consortium says work has resumed on a major expansion of the Panama Canal, following a two-week shutdown caused by a dispute over who is to pay for $1.6 billion in cost overruns.

INDIAN HEADQUARTERS SHOOTING

ALTURAS, California — Authorities say four people were shot to death and two were wounded in a shooting and knife attack at an American Indian tribal headquarters in California.

HAITI-DUVALIER

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — A Haitian appellate court called for further investigation into human rights abuses allegedly committed during the 15-year rule of former dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier, creating an opportunity for the prosecution to submit more evidence and perhaps even launch a trial against him. By Trenton Daniel.

MEXICO-CAR BOOM

CELAYA, Mexico — Sayonara, Japan. Mexico is on track to replace the Asian automotive giant as the second-largest exporter of cars to the United States by the end of the year. An $800 million Honda plant opening Friday in the central state of Guanajuato will produce about 200,000 Fit hatchbacks a year, helping push total Mexican car exports to the U.S. to 1.7 million in 2014, roughly 200,000 more than Japan, consulting firm IHS Automotive says. By Adriana Gomez Licon. AP Photos.

DEFICITS-FADING ISSUE

WASHINGTON — Just four years ago, U.S. deficits and debt were an explosive political combination, propelling Republicans to control of the House of Representatives and fueling the budget fights that would ensue over the next three years. Today, they are an afterthought in Washington’s political and policy landscape. AP Photo.

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