MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Latest on Senate Republicans introduce their own version of the state budget (all times local):

4:25 p.m.

The state Assembly's top Republicans say they agree with most of the Senate's new budget proposal but will have to review the plan.

Senate Republicans introduced their proposal Tuesday as a standoff with their Assembly counterparts over road funding stretches on. It calls for $712 million in additional borrowing to pay for roads, gives public schools $650 million in additional aid and repeals the personal property tax on businesses.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, Majority Leader Jim Steineke and Rep. John Nygren, co-chair of the Legislature's budget committee, issued a statement saying they agree with the "vast majority" of the plan. They say they want to make a significant investment in schools and reduce taxes.

They didn't offer specifics or say whether they agree with the road borrowing. Vos has pushed for raising more revenue for roads rather than borrowing to pay for projects.

They said the Assembly will give the proposal "fair consideration" over the next few days.

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2:50 p.m.

Gov. Scott Walker says he welcomes Senate Republicans' new budget proposal.

The Senate Republicans introduced their own state budget Tuesday as a standoff with their Assembly counterparts over road funding in Walker's budget plan stretches on. The Senate budget calls for $712 million in additional borrowing to pay for roads, honors Walker's proposal to give public schools $650 million in additional aid and repeals the personal property tax on businesses.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson said in an email to The Associated Press that the governor welcomes the Senate's attempt to move the budget process forward. He says the Senate proposal keeps his school, road and tax priorities largely intact. He promised to keep working with the Senate and Assembly to find a solution.

Kit Beyer, a spokeswoman for Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, said Vos would issue a statement later Tuesday.

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12:25 p.m.

Senate Republicans have taken the unusual step of introducing their own version of the state budget as a standoff with their Assembly counterparts over road funding continues.

Republicans in both houses can't agree on how to plug a $1 billion shortfall in the transportation fund. Senate Republicans want to borrow more money. Assembly Republicans want to generate more revenue, possibility by raising the state gas tax and vehicle registration fees. The impasse has brought work on the state budget to a standstill.

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald introduced a new budget during a news conference Tuesday morning. It includes all the budget provisions the Legislature's finance committee has already approved. It also calls for borrowing $712 million for roads, sticks with Gov. Scott Walker's plan to give public schools an additional $650 million and repeals the personal property tax businesses pay.

Assembly Speaker Robin Vos' spokeswoman didn't immediately reply to a message.

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10:15 a.m.

Republicans who control the state Senate are set to introduce their own version of the state budget as a standoff with their Assembly counterparts over road funding drags on.

The Legislature's Joint Finance Committee has been working for months to revise Gov. Scott Walker's budget before forwarding it on to the full Assembly and Senate for votes. The committee's work stopped in mid-June because Senate and Assembly Republicans can't agree on how to fill a $1 billion hole in the transportation fund.

Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald was scheduled to release the Senate's new budget Tuesday morning. His aides say the budget will include all the provisions the finance committee has already approved and will address road funding, school funding and tax changes.