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AM Prep-Cyber Corner

February 11, 2019

IN THE NEWS: JEFF BEZOS SAGA PLAYS OUT IN PUBLIC

NEW YORK (AP) — Much of the recent personal turmoil for Jeff Bezos has played out online — mirroring how many of his Amazon customers shop and readers of The Washington Post get their news. It all started with a surprising tweet — that he and his wife were divorcing after 25 years of marriage. After that, a tabloid revealed Bezos was having an extramarital affair — releasing both texts and photos of him and his mistress, a former TV anchor. And now, Bezos has posted a blog in which he says The National Enquirer tried to blackmail him — threatening to release more intimate photos of him unless he calls off an investigation into how that information was obtained in the first place. While all this personal drama may be distressing to Bezos — it doesn’t appear to have harmed his business interests. He’s the world’s richest man. And most analysts say the ongoing saga is unlikely to hurt his companies, which continue to flourish.

IN THE NEWS: CHECKOUT LINES AND TECHNOLOGY

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Is the checkout line about to be phased out? It isn’t happening right away, but a growing number of companies are trying to find ways to eliminate checkout lines — by eliminating the need to have items scanned at a register. Both startup companies and retailers are installing technology that can tell when a shopper picks up a product and puts it in their cart — and automatically tally up the total and deduct the amount the shopper’s account once they leave. The cameras and scanners can also tell when a shopper puts an item down — and can send a discount to nudge them into buying. Amazon is leading the way in all this; it opened its first cashier-less store a year ago. It now has 10 in three cities: Chicago, San Francisco and Seattle.

ON THE WEB: TARGET CHANGES SMARTPHONE APP AFTER TV STATION REPORT

CYBERSPACE (AP) — Imagine finding an item on a store’s app at a good price — and when you go to pick up the item in person, the price jumps as you approach the store. That is what apparently has been happening with Target — and now the company has modified its app. The app’s location-tracking function lets users find nearby stores or where specific items are located. But Minneapolis station KARE-TV reports the app also bumped the price up as users entered Target parking lots. The station says Target has released an updated version of the app, making clear whether a price listed is “online” or “in-store.”

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Online:

Target site: http://www.target.com

by Oscar Wells Gabriel II

Follow Oscar Wells Gabriel II on Twitter at https://twitter.com/OWGabriel2

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