OKMULGEE, Okla. (AP) _ Okmulgee residents overcame rain and wet grounds to produce the world's biggest pecan pie - 6,500 pounds of sugary, nutty delight.

Lead chef Glenn Shoaf, who stirred up the batch when baking began Friday night and ended early Saturday in time for the town's Pecan Festival, got the first piece.

''That's great,'' he pronounced. ''That's good.''

The effort was to return the largest pie record to Okmulgee, located south of Tulsa, in the heart of the nation's No. 1 pecan-producing county. The town had set the mark a year ago with a 12 1/2 -foot wide, 3,200-pound pie only to lose the title to Albany, Ga., a few months later.

Festival volunteers spent several hours scooping up half-pound servings that sold for $1 each. The pie yielded about 5,000 servings, and the proceeds went to the Okmulgee Chamber of Commerce for several projects.

Here's the recipe:

1,290 pounds sugar.

1,287 pounds corn syrup.

1,000 dozen eggs, and then some.

503 pounds pecans.

Mix in steam-cleaned, oil-lined concrete delivery truck.

Place in 20 1/2 -foot wide steel pan, cover and bake five hours.

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SPIVEY'S CORNER, N.C. (AP) - For the second straight season, the annual Spivey's Corner National Hollerin' Contest has gone to the dogs.

Charles Batton, a Louisburg police officer who imitated a pack of dogs chasing a deer during hunting season, captured the title in the 19th edition of the yell-off Saturday afternoon. Last year, a poodle and his master collaborated for the championship.

''I can fool dogs,'' the winner proclaimed. ''Other dogs come to me when we're out hunting and I start doing that.''

The 35-year-old Batton said he has honed his ''dog hollers'' over the past five years, adding that he does the calls at clubs and parties on request.

''They've told me to come to Spivey's Corner and said I'd probably win, but I just never got around to it,'' Batton said. This weekend, he had to get another officer to take his place on duty, then he walked away with first prize.

''I thought I could do it, but thought two other (hollerers) were better than me,'' he said. ''I don't do much hollerin' in my job. I have to hold it in a lot.''

Gene Jackson, a Goldsboro librarian who won second prize, said the contest is the only chance he gets to really let go.

''All day, I wanted to go 'Shush, shush,''' he joked.

Jackson offered a holler in honor of deposed minister Jim Bakker and his wife, Tammy Faye. He yodeled ''money, money, money'' over and over.