WASHINGTON (AP) _ Unimpressed by the presidential campaigns of Vice President George Bush, Sen. Bob Dole of Kansas and Rep. Jack Kemp of New York, New Hampshire Republican activist Mike Dunbar said Monday he has decided to try to draft New York real estate tycoon Donald Trump.

Trump has repeatedly said he is not interested in politics.

Dunbar, former vice chairman of the Portsmouth, N.H., Republican Party, said he has decided to try to collect the 1,000 signatures necessary to put Trump's name on the primary ballot in New Hampshire.

Trump spokesman Dan Klores said Monday: ''At this time, he has absolutely no interest in seeking political office or running for president of the United States.''

Dunbar said he is not discouraged that Trump has rebuffed those who have repeatedly tried to get him to run for governor of New York or mayor of New York City.

''I've never been worth $900 million but I think there probably is a certain point where there have to be bigger challenges, and that's what I hope to present him with, a bigger challenge: straighten out the country,'' Dunbar said in a telephone interview from Portsmouth.

Trump, builder of the Trump Tower skyscraper on New York's Fifth Avenue and owner of two Atlantic City, N.J., casinos, has recently skirmished with New York Mayor Edward Koch over plans for Television City, a project that would include the world's tallest building.

Dunbar, himself a failed candidate for the Portsmouth City Council, estimated it would take him ''no more than a couple of weeks'' to collect 1,000 petition signatures.

Dunbar said Bush and Dole are ''not going anywhere; those two guys are duds,'' and he had slight praise for Kemp, but ''I figure Trump has what it takes.''

''I figured that on issues like the deficit, Trump has really great qualifications,'' Dunbar said. ''Every project that I know he's ever undertaken, he's come in under budget and ahead of time. If we had a guy like that running the country, and who could delegate that sort of expertise to the Pentagon, I think we could make some real inroads into the financial problems the country has.''