PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — The Latest on proposed new restrictions on amendments to the state constitution (all times local):

8:55 a.m.

South Dakota representatives have rejected a measure that would have given the Legislature more control over amendments to the state constitution.

The House State Affairs Committee voted Wednesday against the plan. Under the measure, constitutional changes would have needed approval from the voters and the Legislature to pass.

Right now, people who collect enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot can ask voters to pass it without lawmakers' blessing.

Republican Rep. David Lust, who opposed the measure, says the Legislature doesn't need to inject itself into that process.

House Speaker Mark Mickelson, a supporter, says there should be a "rigorous process" when amending the state constitution.

The committee also voted to table a plan that would have ended citizens' ability to gather signatures to propose constitutional amendments.

Both changes would have required voter approval.

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8:25 a.m.

A South Dakota House panel has advanced a measure that would require constitutional amendments to encompass only one subject.

The House State Affairs Committee voted Wednesday to send the resolution to the chamber's floor. If approved by the Legislature, the measure would go to November voters.

House Speaker Mark Mickelson, the sponsor, says it's meant to simplify the constitutional amendment process. He says it's intended to make sure that people understand the idea they're voting for at the ballot box.

Democrats on the committee opposed the plan. Democratic Rep. Julie Bartling questioned how it would be implemented.

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7:42 a.m.

A South Dakota House committee plans to debate asking voters to give the Legislature more control over amendments to the state constitution.

Constitutional changes would need approval from the voters and the Legislature to pass under the plan the House State Affairs Committee will take up Wednesday.

Right now, people who collect enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot can ask voters to pass it without lawmakers' input or blessing.

Another measure set for debate by the panel would require constitutional amendments to encompass only one subject.

Republican Rep. Mark Mickelson has said he's not going to push to pass a different plan that would end citizens' ability to gather signatures to propose constitutional amendments.

Any of the changes would have to pass at the ballot.