PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The Latest on the Maine election (all times local):

12:05 a.m.

Residents of Lewiston and Auburn have overwhelmingly rejected a proposed merger.

Supporters said that combining two cities into a single municipality with nearly 60,000 residents and the state's largest school system would've saved money.

The proposal needed majorities in both cities.

Residents, like their city leaders, were divided. Lewiston Mayor Robert Macdonald supported a merger, but Auburn Mayor Jonathan Labonte was opposed. Both are Republicans.

The Sun Journal reported that unofficial results showed the proposal lost 6,540 to 3,315 in Lewiston and by 6,330 to 1,202 in Auburn.

Such mergers are rare. The last time it happened was in 1922 when residents in Dover and Foxcroft voted to merge to create the town of Dover-Foxcroft.

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10:21 p.m.

A proposed merger of Lewiston and Auburn has been rejected by residents.

Supporters said that combining two cities separated by the Androscoggin River into a single municipality with nearly 60,000 residents and the state's largest school system would save money.

Auburn voters rejected it. Lewiston votes were still being tabulated.

But the proposal needed majorities in both cities.

Residents, like their city leaders, were divided. Lewiston Mayor Robert Macdonald supported a merger, but Auburn Mayor Jonathan Labonte was opposed. Both are Republicans.

Such mergers are rare. The last time it happened was in 1922 when residents in Dover and Foxcroft voted to merge to create the town of Dover-Foxcroft.

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9:46 p.m.

The husband of the late state Rep. Gina Mason has won a special election to fill her seat.

Richard Mason, a Republican, beat Democrat Scott Gaiason on Tuesday in the election in House District 56, which includes Lisbon.

The seat was left empty when Gina Mason died on Sept. 5 at age 57. The winner will serve out her term, through November 2018.

The Masons' son is Senate Majority Leader Garrett Mason, who's running for governor.

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9:42 p.m.

Mainers have approved a constitutional amendment dealing with the state pension system.

The ballot question on Tuesday dealt with amortization of pension losses.

Many voters were confused by the wording of the ballot question, but it still won support.

The idea was to stretch from 10 years to 20 years the time required to pay back any unfunded liability that was created by investment losses. The state says the extended timeline would insulate the system from shifts in the economy while still protecting the public retirement system.

The pension system to support retired state employees and teachers is in Maine Constitution, so any changes require a constitutional amendment approved by referendum.

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9:20 p.m.

Mainers have approved a $105 million transportation bond issue.

The proposal on the Tuesday ballot will bring an estimated $137 million in matching grants. The bulk of the money would be used to improve secondary roads and bridges.

Money would also benefit ports, harbors, marine transportation, aviation, railroad and bicycle and pedestrian trails. A small amount would also go to improving culverts, stream crossings and wildlife habitats.

The bond proposal represented the second of three consecutive years of borrowing planned by the Maine Department of Transportation to fill highway funding gaps.

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9:07 p.m.

Voters in Maine say they don't want a third casino in the state.

The casino proposal failed in a statewide vote on Tuesday. The ballot question was written in such a way that only gambling entrepreneur Shawn Scott's company could run it. It would have been located at a yet-to-be-determined location in the southern part of the state.

Supporters of the proposal said it would prove to be a windfall for schools, jobs and the economy.

Opponents peppered traffic medians with signs decrying it as a "wicked shady deal." Critics included Maine Republican Gov. Paul LePage.

During this campaign, the Maine ethics commission imposed a record $500,000 in fines against four pro-casino committees.

Existing casinos are in Oxford and Bangor.

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12:28 a.m.

Maine voters are deciding whether the state should have a third casino.

An out-of-state gambling entrepreneur bankrolled the campaign to create a casino in York County. He would be the one to operate the casino if it's approved.

Supporters say it would create jobs, boost education and help veterans, seniors and others. Critics include Republican Maine Gov. Paul LePage, who has called it another case of "big-money, out-of-state interests using Maine voters to get a sweet deal."

The Maine ethics commission imposed $500,000 in fines against four pro-casino committees for missing deadlines for filing disclosures that accurately reflected who was funding the campaign.

Also on the statewide ballot Tuesday is a proposal to expand Medicaid, a transportation bond and a constitutional amendment to reduce volatility.