WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is incensed over a deal his longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen cut with prosecutors. Trump told "Fox & Friends," in an interview broadcast Thursday, that it might be better if "flipping" were illegal because people "just make up lies." Trump has tried to play down his relationship his longtime "fixer" who claims the president directed a hush-money scheme to buy the silence of two women who say they had affairs with Trump.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A juror in Paul Manafort's financial fraud trial says a lone holdout prevented the jury from convicting the onetime Trump campaign chairman on all 18 counts. The juror says jurors repeatedly tried to persuade the holdout to "look at the paper trail" but she insisted there was reasonable doubt. The jury on Tuesday found Manafort guilty on eight counts. The judge declared a mistrial on 10 counts the jury was deadlocked on.

CHICAGO (AP) — What the Democratic Party first thought was a malicious attempt to hack the party's massive voter information file turned out to be just a security test. Bob Lord, the Democratic National Committee's chief security officer, said Thursday the attempted hack was "built by a third party as part of a simulated phishing test." Lord said the test, which mimicked several attributes of actual attacks on the Democratic party's voter file, was not authorized by the DNC, VoteBuilder nor any of the party's vendors.

UNDATED (AP) — Tech companies want to protect U.S. political candidates from Russian hackers ahead of the midterm elections, but could that free help count as an illegal campaign contribution? That's the question Microsoft asked the Federal Election Commission this week. The company is requesting an advisory opinion from the FEC to confirm a new free package of online account security protections it's providing to "election-sensitive" customers doesn't count as in-kind campaign contributions.

HONOLULU (AP) — Hurricane Lane is soaking Hawaii's Big Island, dumping 12 inches of rain in 12 hours as residents stocked up on supplies and tried to protect their homes ahead of the state's first hurricane since 1992. The National Weather Service warns that some areas could see up to 30 inches before the system passes. Bands of rain extend 350 miles from the hurricane's center.