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Red cross column: Whose turn is it this month?

November 25, 2018

As we sat around the table giving our reports, the question came up in the end of the agenda, “Whose turn was it this month to write the monthly article for our organization?”

It seems that when you find someone who does a good job at something it’s hard to give that job to anyone else, right? The head manager or administrator seems to be that right person because he or she is in charge and should know more than the rest of us about the organization or events that took place the past month or what’s happening next month. That question “Whose turn is it,” jolted me, thinking who’s going to volunteer when that responsible person is not around anymore? Who’s going to take their position because everyone thinks they are irreplaceable? Who’s going to give blood when it’s needed most? What’s going to happen in a traumatic surgery or accident and someone needs that blood?

Now that Thanksgiving is over, we have the upcoming holidays. It’s easy to get distracted getting ready for Christmas and New Year. There is shopping for that perfect turkey, place settings, decorations for the table, Black Friday for that high-profile shopping surprise gift at Christmas that probably will be set aside after a month or so. Setting up the lights and Christmas tree, Christmas Eve church services, weekly advent soup suppers, then there is preparing for the new year, taking down those lights, preparing New Year’s dinner, resolutions to make and packing those Christmas trees away and storing the ornaments away for next year.

In the advent season, who’s volunteering during the holiday by saving lives while we are enjoying the festivities? Whose turn is it now to give Blood? Whose turn is it to install those safety alarms so we can prevent accident or loss of life, property and reaction time getting the family out of the house safely in a fire emergency?

When we ask “Whose turn is it?”, shouldn’t we ask ourselves “How can we prepare for the worst scenario rather than have to re-act in those emergencies?” All of us fall pray to emergency medical issues, Surgery, accidents, mini or catastrophic and unknown emergencies.

For the holidays let us all consider to “Give a Life.” Volunteer to purchase and donate an alarm to the Red Cross for someone in need of that precious life-saving device. Let’s take time and donate your time and talents to the Red Cross with one or two hours a week. Let’s give a few minutes and donate some blood. Give a financial donation to your local Red Cross in memory or in the name of someone, or just because. Instead of gifts to one another in the family or extended family, give a pledge that lasts all year as a family to a charitable cause (Hopefully the American Red Cross).

This has been a most unusual year for fires and natural disasters locally and nationally. Give a donation or sponsor a gift for those who lost homes and everything they owned.

During the holidays ask yourself, “Whose turn is it this month?” Donations for blood or sponsoring a Blood Drive to collect blood are most critical now. “Only you can prevent forest fires,” says Smokey the Bear. I speak for The American Red Cross and suggest without reservation that only you can prevent that shortage of blood, donations, sponsorship and volunteer support and contribution of time when it’s needed most and while we’re able. For me it’s a gratifying experience and a blessing that I can still volunteer and donate healthy life saving blood.

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