LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on Michigan's primary election (all times local):

2 p.m.

Former Michigan state Rep. Rashida Tlaib has won the Democratic nomination to run unopposed for the House seat long held by former Rep. John Conyers and likely will become the first Muslim female elected to Congress.

No Republicans ran in Tuesday's District 13 primary race, meaning Tlaib is set to win the seat in November's election and begin serving a full two-year term in January.

Tlaib defeated five other candidates to win the nomination. She also ran in Tuesday's special primary election to complete the final two months of Conyers' final term.

The 42-year-old Tlaib served in the Michigan House from 2009 until 2014.

The 89-year-old Conyers was first elected to the House in 1964. He stepped down in December citing health reasons, though several former female staffers had accused him of sexual harassment.

The heavily Democratic 13th District covers much of Detroit and some of its suburbs.

___

11:30 p.m.

Democrat Elissa Slotkin will face Republican Rep. Mike Bishop in what is expected to be a competitive race for a Michigan congressional district that stretches between Lansing and the northern Detroit suburbs.

Slotkin — who had U.S. intelligence, national security and defense roles during the Obama and Bush administrations — beat Michigan State University professor Chris Smith in Tuesday's Democratic primary. The incumbent Bishop defeated business owner Lokesh Kumar in the GOP race.

Democrats hoping for a "blue wave" in November see the 8th District as a pickup opportunity. Bishop, a former legislative leader, is seeking a third term in the GOP-leaning seat.

___

10:10 p. m.

Detroit-area businessman and Iraq War veteran John James has won the Republican nomination to run against Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow this fall.

James, a political newcomer endorsed by President Donald Trump, defeated Sandy Pensler in Tuesday's primary.

Stabenow is seeking a fourth Senate term and has easily fended off past challengers, but Trump's narrow 2016 victory in Michigan has the GOP hopeful it can flip the seat.

The 37-year-old James is an executive at his family's automotive logistics companies and a West Point graduate who flew helicopters during the Iraq War.

He is Michigan's first black Republican nominee for a major statewide office in more than three decades, but he has said he only wants to be assessed on his character.

___

9:55 p.m.

Gretchen Whitmer has won the Democratic nomination for Michigan governor, besting two competitors to advance to the November race to succeed term-limited Republican Gov. Rick Snyder.

Whitmer, a former legislative leader, defeated chemical-testing businessman Shri Thanedar (Shree TAN'-eh-dahr) and ex-Detroit health director Abdul El-Sayed in Tuesday's primary. She will face Attorney General Bill Schuette, who defeated Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines in the GOP primary.

Whitmer was considered the favorite due to her political experience and broad support from organized labor and other key groups. El-Sayed especially courted the party's more liberal, pro-Bernie Sanders wing, as did Thanedar, who spent millions of dollars of his own money on his campaign.

The Michigan governorship is a top target for the Democratic Party, which is eager to make gains in the Midwest, where Republicans have dominated state governments and which helped President Donald Trump take the White House in 2016.

___

9:25 p.m.

State Attorney General Bill Schuette (SHOOT'-ee) has won the Republican nomination for Michigan governor, defeating three other candidates vying to succeed term-limited GOP Gov. Rick Snyder.

Schuette beat Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines. Democrats running were former legislative leader Gretchen Whitmer, ex-Detroit health director Abdul El-Sayed and entrepreneur Shri Thanedar.

Schuette, a former congressman, state lawmaker and appellate judge, was endorsed by President Donald Trump. He says he would cut the state income tax, like Trump reduced federal taxes.

The Michigan governorship is a top target for the Democratic Party, which is eager to make gains in the Midwest, where Republicans have dominated state governments and which helped President Donald Trump take the White House in 2016.

___

9 p.m.

Polls have closed in Michigan where primary voters will decide key nominations are for governor, U.S. Senate and other offices.

Voters on Tuesday are choosing would-be successors to Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who cannot run again due to term limits, and a GOP nominee to face third-term Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow.

The primary also is when the next congressman or congresswoman will effectively be chosen in two solidly Democratic U.S. House seats opening due to retirements, and when nominees will be selected for an open battleground district in suburban Detroit.

Democrat Gretchen Whitmer and Republican Bill Schuette are considered the favorites for governor. She faces challenges from Dr. Abdul El-Sayed and businessman Shri Thanedar.

Schuette is going against Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines.

___

3 p.m.

Sheryl Williams of Traverse City says Gretchen Whitmer's experience makes her the best choice for the Democratic nomination for Michigan governor.

Voters on Tuesday are choosing would-be successors to Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who cannot run again due to term limits.

The 58-year-old Williams says she voted for Whitmer because the former Senate minority leader "has actually governed and knows what governing means."

Jim Morse of Traverse City supported Democrat Abdul El-Sayed. The 38-year-old chef says he likes El-Sayed's progressive positions and youth, and says he's "working for the people, not for the corporations."

Another Democratic running is businessman Shri Thanedar.

On the Republican side, retired business consultant Steve Lauer of Leelanau County says he voted for Bill Schuette because of his lengthy experience and conservative positions. The 75-year-old Lauer says he wants balanced budgets and lower taxes.

Other GOP candidates are Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines.

___

11:20 a.m.

Utility crews in the Detroit area are working to restore electrical service to several polling places without power due to severe thunderstorms.

In a video on DTE Energy's Twitter feed , executive director Ryan Stowe says about 14 polling places were without power following Monday evening's storms and as of Tuesday morning crews had restored power to at least five. In all, he says about 40,000 customers lost power and about half were restored Tuesday morning.

Stowe says the utility is "doing everything we can" to get power back quickly to voting locations for the primary election.

Storms knocked down trees and power lines, with the heaviest damage reported on the east side of Detroit. In suburban Grosse Pointe Park, WWJ-AM reports a polling place at Pierce Middle School used generator power Tuesday morning.

11:15 a.m.

Jason Rybak says business has been good at his tax-and-law office in suburban Detroit, but he's eager for an outsider in the Michigan governor's office.

The 46-year-old says he voted Tuesday for Dr. Jim Hines in the Republican primary over Attorney General Bill Schuette and Lt. Gov. Brian Calley. Rybak of St. Clair Shores says Hines is the "only one who's not a career politician."

Rybak says Schuette and Calley don't have the same "energy."

Laura Hetzler of Grosse Pointe Woods says she voted for Gretchen Whitmer in the Democratic primary. She likes Whitmer's emphasis on education and says the ex-lawmaker should have wide appeal in a general election.

Hetzler says she'll vote for a Democrat in the fall but is concerned about "anti-Muslim bias" if Dr. Abdul El-Sayed wins the primary.

___

7:05 a.m.

Polls are open in most of Michigan where primary voters will decide key nominations are for governor, U.S. Senate and other offices.

Voters on Tuesday are choosing would-be successors to Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who cannot run again due to term limits, and a GOP nominee to face third-term Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow.

The primary also is when the next congressman or congresswoman will effectively be chosen in two solidly Democratic U.S. House seats opening due to retirements, and when nominees will be selected for an open battleground district in suburban Detroit.

Democrat Gretchen Whitmer and Republican Bill Schuette are considered the favorites for governor. She faces challenges from Dr. Abdul El-Sayed and businessman Shri Thanedar.

Schuette is going against Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines.

Polls close at 8 p.m.

___

12:45 a.m.

Key nominations are at stake for governor, U.S. Senate and other offices in Michigan's primary.

Voters on Tuesday will choose the major party candidates who will vie to replace Republican Gov. Rick Snyder, who has reached his term limit, and a GOP nominee to take on Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow, who is seeking a fourth term.

The primary also is when the next congressman or congresswoman will effectively be chosen in two solidly Democratic U.S. House districts whose seats are opening due to retirements, and when nominees will be selected for an open battleground district in suburban Detroit.

Democrat Gretchen Whitmer and Republican Bill Schuette are considered the favorites for governor, but Michigan's electorate is unpredictable. Whitmer faces challenges from Dr. Abdul El-Sayed and businessman Shri Thanedar.

Schuette is going against Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Dr. Jim Hines.