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December 7, 2018

TRUMP - U.N. AMBASSADOR

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is expected to announce he will nominate State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert to be the next U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.

Two administration officials confirmed Trump’s plans yesterday. A Republican congressional aide said the president was expected to announce his decision by tweet this morning.

Trump has previously said Nauert was under serious consideration to replace Nikki Haley, who announced in October that she would step down at the end of this year. If Nauert is confirmed by the Senate, she would be a leading administration voice on Trump’s foreign policy.

Still, with Trump, no staffing decision is final until he makes the formal announcement, since he has been known to change course in the past.

TRUMP - UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS

NEW YORK (AP) — A lawyer for two undocumented workers hired by a resort owned by President Donald Trump says that one of them was called “donkey” and “dog” by a supervisor and threatened with deportation to get her to work harder.

Anibal Romero, a lawyer representing Victorina Morales and Sandra Diaz, tells The Associated Press that the two women used false Social Security and permanent resident documents to get jobs at Trump’s resort in Bedminster, New Jersey.

The lawyer says the two are considering a lawsuit against the Trump Organization for workplace abuse and discrimination. One of them, Morales, who says she cleaned Trump’s clothes and made his bed, is also seeking asylum.

The Trump Organization says it has strict hiring practices and that it will fire anyone who submits false documents.

WISCONSIN - LAME-DUCK SESSION

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker is weighing whether to sign a sweeping package of bills that would weaken the powers of his Democratic successor.

Walker spokesman Tom Evenson says the governor was reviewing the bills that passed early Wednesday morning during a rare lame-duck legislative session. The Republican-controlled Legislature approved the measures following overnight debate.

Evenson didn’t give a time frame for when Walker would act. Walker has six days to take action once the bills are delivered to him.

Walker’s office worked closely with legislators to craft the measures, but Republican lawmakers made last-minute changes during late-night negotiations.

Walker is getting bipartisan pressure to veto the measures, including from Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers (EE’-vers). Walker has already signaled general support for the legislation.

“DAY OF INFAMY” REMEMBERED

HONOLULU (AP) — Retired U.S. Navy Cmdr. Don Long was alone on an anchored military seaplane in the middle of a bay across the island from Pearl Harbor when Japanese warplanes started striking Hawaii on December 7, 1941 — watching from afar as the bombs and bullets came closer, eventually reaching and destroying his solitary outpost.

The waves of attacking planes reached his military installation on Kaneohe Bay soon after Pearl Harbor was struck, and the young sailor saw buildings and planes start to explode all around him.

When the gunfire finally reached him, setting the aircraft ablaze, he was forced to jump into the water and swim through fire to safety.

Now, 77 years later, Long will remember that day in Napa, California, where the 97-year-old survivor will reflect on the anniversary and honor those who died.

MAN WHO PLOWED INTO PEDESTRIANS WITH CAR PLEADS GUILTY

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — A man who deliberately rammed a car into pedestrians in a busy Australian city street injuring 17 people has pleaded guilty to multiple charges including murder.

Saeed Noori drove his mother’s SUV into pedestrians on Dec. 21 last year on a sidewalk in downtown Melbourne, Australia’s second-largest city.

The 33-year-old pleaded guilty in the Victoria state Supreme Court today to the murder of 83-year-old man. Noori faces a potential life sentence on that conviction. He also pleaded guilty to 11 counts of recklessly causing serious injury, which carries a potential maximum of 15 years in prison, and five counts of conduct endangering life, which carries a potential 10 years in prison.

He will return to court for sentencing in February.

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