AP NEWS
Related topics

Names in the News

January 1, 1985

LOS ANGELES (AP) _ Millionaire publisher Walter Annenberg and television star Mr. T were among the contributors who helped push to $10.1 million in pledges the amount raised by a United Negro College Fund telethon.

Singer Lou Rawls was host for the weekend telethon, the fifth such cavalcade but the first to be nationally televised. The goal was $15 million in donations, but the final tally didn’t include $4 million in pledges from six corporations, Beverly Werber of Rogers and Associates, a Los Angeles public relations firm, said Monday.

Ms. Werber said that among the contributions to the 12-hour Parade of Stars were $100,000 from Annenberg, a confidant of President Reagan, and $15,000 from ″A-Team″ star Mr. T.

Such stars as Diahann Carroll, Billy Dee Williams and Shirley Jones participated in the event, and Charleton Heston made a plea for donations.

Michael Jackson contributed 12 autographed dolls, which were given away to some pledge-makers, Ms. Werber said.Jackson has also pledged to donate a third of his Victory Tour profits, she said.

″We’re hoping it’s at least one new library for one of our colleges,″ she said.

The United Negro College Fund is a collective fund-raising arm of 42 institutions which enroll 45,000 students annually. Nearly all the students are black, and more than half come from families with annual incomes of less than $14,000.

---

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) - U.S. Sen. Jennings Randolph will go back 60 years to his roots when he retires this month and returns to write for a weekly newspaper where he worked at the age of 22.

″I didn’t realize it’s been that long,″ the 82-year-old Randolph said Monday of his new job on The New West Virginia Review, which was revived last fall after a 36-year publishing hiatus.

Randolph will contribute feature stories to the newspaper after his retirement on Jan. 14, he said from Houston where he went to watch West Virginia University play in Monday night’s Bluebonnet Bowl.

During his one year at the Reivew 60 years ago, he said, he ″wrote two or three articles for each issue. I wrote articles on all the colleges in the state. I sold advertising and took subscriptions, too.″

The Review closed in the late 1940s because of a newsprint shortage, said Jim Comstock, the paper’s new publisher, who said he will give Randolph the same title he held at the old Review - associate editor.

Randolph left the Review in 1926 to become a journalism and speech professor at Davis & Elkins College and in 1932 began the first of seven terms in Congress. In 1958, after a 12-year absence from Washington, he won his Senate seat.

---

LOS ANGELES (AP) - A Superior Court jury has awarded $3.9 million in damages to a man left paralyzed from the chest down by a 1979 accident involving a car driven by singer-actor Leif Garrett.

The jury found that Roland Winkler, 24, had sustained damages worth $4.2 million. But it also decided that Winkler was 8 percent responsible for the accident, and the award Monday was reduced by that share.

In addition, the jury assessed punitive damages of $15,000 against Garrett, 23.

Winkler was a passenger in a sports car leased by Garrett that rear-ended another vehicle, flipped over and rolled off a Hollywood Freeway embankment on Nov. 3, 1979.

Garrett escaped injury and later pleaded no contest to a felony drunken driving charge in Juvenile Court. He was put on one year’s probation, said Winkler’s attorney, Ed Steinbrecher.

Evidence at the civil trial showed that Garrett’s blood-alcohol level was 0.28 percent - nearly three times the legal limit in California - and that he was also on drugs when arrested after the accident, Steinbrecher said.

Steinbrecher said Winkler was also found negligent in that he too had taken drugs and alcohol, and should have known better than to drive with Garrett.

″I think this will send a message out that if you’re intoxicated as a passenger, you’re somewhat at fault,″ Steinbrecher said. ″But if you’re driving under the influence of drugs and alcohol, you’ll have to pay the price.″

AP RADIO
Update hourly