MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The Latest on efforts to invalidate Wisconsin's Republican-drawn legislative boundaries (all times local):

1:30 p.m.

Democrats are filing a second federal lawsuit challenging Republican-drawn legislative boundaries.

The Assembly Democratic Campaign Committee filed the lawsuit Friday, hours after a group of Democratic voters renewed their own federal challenge.

The lawsuits largely mirror one another. Both the ADCC and the voters allege Republican lawmakers unconstitutionally consolidated GOP when they redrew the boundaries in 2011.

The ADCC also argues the boundaries are causing serious difficulties in fundraising, registering voters and attracting volunteers.

A three-judge panel ruled in the voters' favor in 2016 but the U.S. Supreme Court ruled this summer that the voters lacked standing to sue on a statewide basis. The voters filed an amended complaint Friday adding 28 more voters as plaintiffs.

___

11 a.m.

Attorneys looking to invalidate Wisconsin's Republican-drawn legislative boundaries are adding more voters as plaintiffs in a lawsuit after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to consider the case this past summer.

A dozen voters filed a federal lawsuit in 2015 alleging Republicans unconstitutionally consolidated GOP power when they redrew the boundaries in 2011. A three-judge panel agreed but the state Justice Department appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court in June refused to hear the case, saying the plaintiffs lacked standing to sue on a statewide basis. Rather than dismissing the lawsuit, the justices gave the plaintiffs a chance to prove they have standing.

Attorneys filed an amended complaint Friday adding 28 additional Democratic voters across 34 districts as plaintiffs, alleging the boundaries hurt each of them.

___

8:30 a.m.

Attorneys seeking to invalidate Wisconsin's Republican-drawn legislative boundaries are getting ready to file new arguments after the U.S. Supreme Court refused to consider their lawsuit this past summer.

A dozen voters filed a federal lawsuit in 2015 alleging Republicans unconstitutionally consolidated GOP power when they redrew the boundaries in 2011. A three-judge panel agreed but the state Justice Department appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

The high court in June refused to hear the case, saying the plaintiffs lacked standing to sue on a statewide basis. Rather than dismissing the lawsuit, the justices gave the plaintiffs a chance to prove they have standing.

The voters' attorneys are expected to file an amended complaint Friday morning in federal court in Madison.