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BC-AP Top Stories Digest

April 16, 2019

Here are the AP’s latest coverage plans, top stories and promotable content. All times EDT. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at https://newsroom.ap.org.

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ONLY ON AP

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COLUMBINE-20 YEARS LATER-SCHOOL SAFETY POLL — Twenty years after the Columbine High School shooting made practicing for armed intruders as routine as fire drills, many parents have only tepid confidence in the ability of schools to stop a gunman, according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. And while most Americans consider schools less safe than they were 20 years ago, the poll finds a majority say schools aren’t at fault for shootings. Bullying, the availability of guns, the internet and video games share more of the blame. By Emily Swanson, Carolyn Thompson And Hannah Fingerhut. SENT: 1,250 words, photos.

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TOP STORIES

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FRANCE-NOTRE DAME FIRE — An inferno that raged through Notre Dame Cathedral for more than 12 hours destroyed its spire and its roof but spared its twin medieval bell towers, and a frantic rescue effort saved the monument’s “most precious treasures,” including the Crown of Thorns purportedly worn by Jesus. By Thomas Adamson. SENT: 1,225 words, photos, videos. WITH: — FRANCE-NOTRE DAME FIRE-SAVED AND LOST — What was lost, what was saved from the Notre Dame fire. SENT: 750 words, photos.

NOTRE DAME FIRE-FRANCE UNITES — The disfigurement of Notre Dame felt like a body blow to the French, as impossible to stomach as the eternal loss to New York of its Twin Towers. But the fire that consumed the cathedral’s roof and spire also provoked an outpouring of unity. After months of yellow-jacket protests that have fractured France, the question now is how long the togetherness might last. By John Leicester. UPCOMING: 850 words, photos by 3 p.m.

TRUMP-RUSSIA PROBE-REDACTIONS — Democrats’ demands for a full, unredacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report are likely to prompt a prolonged political and legal battle, with a powerful House chairman prepared to issue subpoenas for the full report. A look at what types of information Attorney General William Barr has said he is redacting in the report being released Thursday. By Mary Clare Jalonick. UPCOMING: 800 words by 4 p.m., photos, video.

COLUMBINE-20 YEARS LATER — Dropping her kids off at school used to be the hardest part of Kacey Ruegsegger Johnson’s day. She would cry most mornings as they left the car, and relied on texted photos from their teachers to make it through the day. Now, the mother of four — and Columbine shooting survivor — sees mornings as an opportunity. She wakes early, makes breakfast and strives to send a clear message before her kids leave home: I adore you. By Kathleen Foody, Allen G. Breed and P. Solomon Banda. SENT: 1,600 words, photos. WITH: COLUMBINE-20 YEARS LATER-PHOTO GALLERY. SENT: 150 words.

VENEZUELA-NEW NORMAL? — Normalcy elsewhere in the world doesn’t fit Venezuela, where two men say they are president and the worst nationwide blackouts played havoc with the lives of millions. Talk in the South American country of what is normal, or should be normal, is touching nerves as the opposition tries to topple President Nicolas Maduro. SENT: 750 words, photos.

FUTURE OF PRIMARY CARE — Patients have so many choices for care now as telemedicine and other options grow. And some question how much they still need a regular doctor. A survey last year found more than a quarter of adults don’t have a primary care doctor. That total jumps to 45% for those under age 30. Health care experts say the changing, fragmented nature of care is precisely why people still need family doctors to look out for their overall health. SENT: 875 words, photos.

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MORE ON NOTRE DAME FIRE

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FRANCE-NOTRE DAME-BILLIONAIRE V BILLIONAIRE — Two of France’s richest men, long locked in a very public rivalry, are once again pitted against each other — this time over flashy and competing donations to rebuild Notre Dame. Billionaire luxury tycoons — Bernard Arnault, 70, and Francois Pinault, 82 — are among France’s fiercest business competitors and patrons. By Thomas Adamson. SENT: 575 words, photos.

NOTRE DAME FIRE-YOUTUBE — As people around the world went online to watch Notre Dame burn, an algorithmic mistake at YouTube attached background information about the Sept. 11 terror attacks in New York. It’s the latest example of artificial intelligence misfiring. UPCOMING: 500 words by 4 p.m.

REBUILDING NOTRE DAME — Notre Dame is not the first historic cathedral to suffer a devastating fire, and it probably won’t be the last. In a sense, that is good news: A global army of experts and craftspeople can be called on for the long, complex process of restoring the gutted landmark. UPCOMING: 600 words, photos by 5 p.m.

FRANCE-WATCHING NOTRE DAME BURN — I started running toward the source of the yellow smoke without knowing what it was — only that it was coming from the island in the middle of the Seine at the heart of so much of Paris’ history. Past bookshops and cafes, I rounded the corner to see flames creeping across the rooftop of Notre Dame Cathedral. I caught my breath and rubbed my stinging eyes. At that point, the roads leading to the cathedral, about 400 meters (yards) away were still open and the fire looked like it might just end up becoming another small scar on a building that had survived so much already. By Lori Hinnant. SENT: 575 words, photos.

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INTERNATIONAL

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LIBYA-MILITIAS — Libya is on the verge of an all-out war involving a rogues’ gallery of militias, many of which are little more than criminal gangs armed with heavy weapons. By Rami Musa and Samy Magdy. SENT: 1,130 words, photos.

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WASHINGTON/POLITICS

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ELECTION 2020-IOWA — Flood damage along Iowa’s western border demonstrates the opportunities and challenges local issues can pose for Democratic presidential candidates. By Alexandra Jaffe. UPCOMING: 800 words by 1 p.m., photo.

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BUSINESS/TECH

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SAMSUNG GALAXY FOLD — When Samsung said this year it would launch a smartphone with a folding screen, the big question was whether the innovation was something people actually wanted or needed. Is the Galaxy Fold a gimmick to help sell more smartphones in a slowing market or a true breakthrough that will change how we use our devices? SENT: 800 words, photos.

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SPORTS

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FBN--SEAHAWKS-EXTENSION — Russell Wilson is now the NFL’s highest-paid player. The Seattle Seahawks quarterback agrees a $140 million, four-year extension. His per year average of $35 million tops that of Aaron Rodgers’ $33.5 million. SENT: 700 words, photos.

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HOW TO REACH US

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At the Nerve Center, Richard A. Somma can be reached at 800-845-8450 (ext. 1600). For photos, Donald E. King (ext. 1900). For graphics and interactives, Phil Holm (ext. 7636). Expanded AP content can be obtained from http://newsroom.ap.org. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact apcustomersupport@ap.org or call 877-836-9477.