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Today in Arizona History

October 3, 2018

PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, Oct. 7

On this date in 1894, the Phoenix Daily Herald described a brilliant meteor which flashed across the sky at about 9 p.m. The meteor traveled from east to west, lighting the night sky until it finally burst like a rocket over the Superstition Mountains and appeared to strike the earth near Silver King.

On this date in 1922, a Bisbee man was shot to death in an argument over the price of tamales.

On this date in 1922, a New-Cornelia Copper Co. appropriated $4 million for the construction of a concentrator and the extension of its power plant in Ajo.

On this date in 1926, three massive teeth, 4 inches (10 centimeters) thick, 12 inches (30 centimeters) wide and 14 inches (36 centimeters) long, were discovered in a dry lake bed near Quitobaquito. The find recalled an old Papago legend concerning a monster which has been said to have once lived in the lake.

On this date in 1929, all court and law offices in Prescott and many in Yavapai County were closed for the funeral of Judge J. Sweeney, Yavapai County’s first superior court judge.

Monday, Oct. 8

On this date in 1878, Southern Pacific Railroad received a charter from the Territory of Arizona and permission to cross the Military Reservation at Yuma.

On this date in 1908, the announcement was made that as a result of the failure of the reverbatory furnace at Helvetia to give the proper results, 100 tons (91 metric tons) of ore would be shipped daily from Helvetia to the Old Dominion smelters at Globe. The ore would be freighted to Vail Station, shipped on the Southern Pacific to Bowie, then on to Globe over the Gila Valley, Globe and Northern R.R.

On this date in 1914, the Apache Trail Stage Company was chartered to haul passengers from the railroad station at Globe to Phoenix, where passengers could resume their rail journey.

On this date in 1924, Louis Y.F. Jaeger who established the first ferry over the Colorado River, was born.

Tuesday, Oct. 9

On this date in 1880, David K. Udall arrived from Kane, Utah, to serve as bishop of St. John’s Ward in Arizona.

On this date in 1898, St. Michael’s Mission, a converted trading post building, was blessed and officially dedicated to St. Michael, the Archangel. The first masses were offered on Oct. 11 with a table to serve as an altar, and salt and pepper shakers as wine and water cruets.

On this date in 1921, the railroad police of the Tucson division of Southern Pacific reported they had removed 3,373 hobos from Southern Pacific trains in one month.

On this date in 1929, plans for a Nogales High School band came one step nearer to reality with the signing of contracts for the purchase of band instruments.

On this date in 2009, three people died following a sweat lodge ceremony in Sedona conducted by self-help author James Arthur Ray. Ray served nearly two years in prison after being convicted of negligent homicide charges.

Wednesday, Oct. 10

On this date in 1908, newspapers reported excellent progress on the new electric power plant under construction on the Hassayampa River south of Wickenburg. The 2,000 horsepower, $250,000 plant was to provide electricity for the town of Wickenburg and mines in the area.

On this date in 1910, the Constitutional Convention convened in Phoenix with George W.P. Hunt elected chairman. Initiative, referendum and recalls were included in spite of President Taft’s warning he would veto the Constitution if it contained those provisions.

On this date in 1920, the Tucson Gas, Electric Light and Power Co. gas plant was destroyed by fire and the city of Tucson was without gas for three weeks.

Thursday, Oct. 11

On this date in 1890, the Yuma Prison entered into a contract to supply prison labor for the making of hemp rope.

On this date in 1920, a fire, doing $750,000 worth of damage destroyed more than half the town of Lowell.

On this date in 1929, Tucson’s first “skyscraper,” the 11-story Consolidated National Bank Building, opened and was visited by 33,000 people in two days.

On this date in 1935, hundreds of Arizona and Utah residents gathered at Lee’s Ferry on the Colorado River to commemorate the historic crossing of early emigrants who came to Arizona to found Mormon communities.

Friday, Oct. 12

On this date in 1849, the first recorded birth of an Anglo baby in Arizona occurred when a “Mrs. Howard,” traveling with a party of immigrants led by Charles E. Pancoast in Flatboats down the Gila River, stopped along the riverbank to give birth to a child she named “Gila.”

On this date in 1869, Miss Charity Gaston, the first teacher on the Navajo Reservation, arrived at Fort Defiance, but because no space was available, she was unable to start classes for two months.

On this date in 1872, in negotiations lasting from Oct. 1 through Oct. 12, Gen. O. O. Howard and Cochise Chief of the Chiricahua Apaches, drafted and signed a peace treaty in the Apache camp in the Dragoon Mountains.

On this date in 1879, the first Methodist church was organized in Tucson by Superintendent George H. Adams.

On this date in 1901, Camillus S. Fly, well known Tombstone photographer and Cochise County Sheriff from 1895 to 1896, died.

On this date in 1929, the city of Florence dedicated its new airport with an aerial circus and speeches.

On this date in 1929, the University of Arizona dedicated its stadium, and the city of Tucson declared a public holiday in honor of the occasion.

On this date in 1940, Tom Mix, early Western movie star, was killed when his car overturned in a wash on what is now the Pinal-Pioneer Parkway.

Saturday, Oct. 13

On this date in 1908, a suit against six Yuma property owners was filed in federal court by the government to have land condemned for the construction of Laguna Dam.

On this date in 1909, President William Howard Taft visited Arizona on a transcontinental tour and promised to do his best to bring statehood there.

On this date in 1913, federal officials arrested the Justice of the Peace at Washington Camp, Ariz., after finding 10,000 rounds of ammunition in his possession. He was charged with running arms across the border.

On this date in 1934, five prisoners broke out of the Holbrook Jail, locked the deputy in a cell, stole all the guns from the sheriff’s office and escaped in a stolen car.

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