FAIRMONT, W.Va. (AP) — A mother-daughter team in their first year of business said they are dedicated to fostering a "greener" way of life to their surrounding communities.

For as long as Josie Martin can remember, her mom, Molly, was always gardening and homesteading on their property out on Opekiska Ridge Road. So, for someone who grew up farming, it was a natural choice after retiring from a lifelong career.

"My mom, within the last few years, retired from working at Mylan Pharmaceuticals for several decades and decided to make a go at some for-profit farming," Martin said.

Greener Path Farms was born, where they focus on chemical-free and sustainablity grown vegetables and fruit while also raising chickens and rabbits.

"This is our first year as a business, and we have a few CSA members, which stands for Community Supported Agriculture, and we also do some business with the Rambling Root in Fairmont," Martin said. "We are also doing the market every Tuesday for the next 17 weeks or so through October."

Martin shared her thoughts on the importance of local farming, stating that it's what we put into our bodies that really counts, and that farming is an industry that has the potential to boost not only the area's economy, but the state's as well.

"First of all, just being aware of what we are putting into our bodies is super important, and unfortunately we live in a day and age where foods are heavily processed or the produce we are buying in the stores aren't really in season and come from very far away where they have been treated with pesticides or sprayed with chemicals," Martin said. "Our main thing is that we are chemical free and sustainablity grown so that it's healthy to eat and you can just go out and pick it, and also sustainable for the environment with the way we grow it. We aren't putting harmful things into the ground."

Martin also thinks that farming in general can be positive economically and environmentally for the Mountain State.

"I think West Virginia has been so characterized by these industries that are extractive and harmful and limited," Martin said. "People come in and take something that isn't renewable and leave, and it kind of leaves our state in economic and environmental distress. To me, the solution to that is farming. We have all of this beautiful land around us, and it's something that builds community and helps people to not rely on these outside industries that don't really have their best interest at heart. That's where we are coming from."

Greener Path Farms hosts a farmers market every Tuesday from 4-7 p.m. at the Pisgah Church on Route 73 off the Goshen Road exit. They will have a variety of vegetables depending on the season as well as eggs and rabbit meat. For this Tuesday they will have cucumbers, lettuce, beets, zucchini, cilantro and more available for purchase.

For more information and to see what's on the menu for upcoming markets, like Greener Path Farms on Facebook.

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Information from: Times West Virginian, http://www.timeswv.com