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Find which Ohio restaurants, other food handlers were cited by health officials in 2017-18 inspection year (database)

July 12, 2018

Find which Ohio restaurants, other food handlers were cited by health officials in 2017-18 inspection year (database)

CLEVELAND, Ohio - Find out if your favorite restaurants and other places that handle food are in this Ohio database of citations issued during food inspections by health officials.

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The database contains 197,970 violations at more than 25,000 businesses, institutions or government agencies during the inspection year that ran from March 2017 through February 2018.

Common violations include food not being kept at the right temperature to cooks not properly cleaning their hands and utensils.

The data is from county and city departments that filed their reports electronically with the Ohio Department of Health.

About half of the state’s 114 health departments, including Shaker Heights, are not yet participating in the voluntary program first offered in June 2013. But the database is complete for the rest of Cuyahoga County with inspections by either the county health district or the city of Cleveland.

Also included from Greater Cleveland are citations issued by health departments for Lake County, Lorain County, Medina County, Summit County and the city of Kent.

Each business handling food is inspected by the local health department at least once a year. There are two inspections a year for places that cook and serve food, or slice meats.

Health officials say finding a problem is not unusual. In the past, problems were found during more than half the restaurant visits in Cuyahoga County. But a high number of violations or the seriousness of them could raise concerns for customers.

Critical violations are often corrected on the spot. Time is often provided to fix other problems. There are no fines, but health officials can threaten to suspend or revoke licenses to operate.

Rich Exner, data analysis editor for the Northeast Ohio Media Group, examines a variety of issues with Numbers Behind the News. Follow on Twitter @RichExner

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