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AP-KY--Kentucky News Digest 2 pm, KY

October 10, 2018

Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up in Kentucky. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Louisville bureau at (502) 583-7718 or aplouisville@ap.org. Beth Campbell is on the desk. News editor Scott Stroud can be reached at sstroud@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. If circumstances change before 6 p.m., a new digest will be sent reflecting those developments. All times are Eastern.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Top Stories:

McCONNELL-AP INTERVIEW

WASHINGTON — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell acknowledged Wednesday that Republicans have a longstanding gender gap when it comes to American women, but he stood by one key Senate woman, saying “nobody’s going to beat” Lisa Murkowski of Alaska despite her opposition to Brett Kavanaugh.

APPALACHIA-ALUMINUM MILL

ASHLAND, Ky. — Things fall through for Chris Jackson. A construction job, promised if he completed a carpentry program, vanished two weeks before his exit exam. A coveted, $100,000-a-year union job at a steel mill disappeared when the plant closed.

RECYCLING SHAKE-UP

ALBANY, N.Y. — America’s recycling industry is in the dumps. A crash in the global market for recyclables is forcing communities to make hard choices about whether they can afford to keep recycling or should simply send all those bottles, cans and plastic containers to the landfill.

HOLIDAY HIRING-STRUGGLES

WASHINGTON — Across the country, America’s retailers and shipping companies are looking happily forward to a robust holiday shopping season. There’s just one concern: Who will stock the shelves, pack the orders and ring up customers?

MIA NO LONGER

BELLEVUE, Neb. — Nearly 77 years after repeated torpedo strikes tore into the USS Oklahoma, killing hundreds of sailors and Marines, Carrie Brown leaned over the remains of a serviceman laid out on a table in her lab and was surprised the bones still smelled of burning oil from that horrific day at Pearl Harbor.

In Brief:

—OFFICER SHOT ACCIDENTALLY, from Owensboro: Kentucky State Police say a police officer was shot by a homeowner who may have mistaken the officer for a prowler.

—METALSA PLANT EXPANSION, from Elizabethtown: A car parts manufacturer says an expansion at one of its plants in Kentucky will create roughly 250 jobs.

—ASIAN CARP, from Paducah: The state of Kentucky has awarded a contract for the establishment of a fish house to expand the market for an invasive species, Asian carp.

—AIRPORT GRANTS, from Louisville: Two airports in Louisville are getting $24.4 million in federal grants to make infrastructure improvements.

—MEDIEVAL RE-ENACTOR IMPALEMENT, from Williamstown: A Medieval knight re-enactor has impaled himself with his lance during a performance and died.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to aplouisville@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, (212) 621-1900 for news and (212) 621-1918 for sports. For technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or (877) 836-9477.

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