SYDNEY, Australia (AP) _ Inger Miller, second to Marion Jones in the 100 and 200 meters at the U.S. trials and a medal favorite in both Olympic events, will miss the 100 and is questionable for the rest of the Sydney Games because of an injury.

Caryn Nguyen, a spokeswoman for the HSI track club for which Miller runs, said Tuesday that Miller is out of the 100. Nguyen said Miller would address her status for the rest of the games at a news conference Wednesday morning (Tuesday night EDT).

Karen Dennis, head coach for the U.S. women's team, said Miller was seeking medical advice before deciding whether she had a chance of running in Sydney. In addition to the 100 and 200, she was supposed to be part of the U.S. 400-meter relay team.

``I know there's a possibility that Inger will not run,'' Dennis said. ``They're supposed to see some doctors and get back to me in the morning.''

CNN/SI reported that Miller severely strained her left hamstring on Sept. 7 while running a series of sprints at the UCLA track in Los Angeles. Dennis and Nguyen would not comment on that report or describe Miller's injury.

``I'm sad, but I have to understand that this isn't the end of the world,'' Miller told CNN/SI. ``The timing is really tough on this, but I refuse to say 'Why me?' Because I didn't say 'why me?' when I had a great season last year. So what gives me the right to say it now?''

Miller, who won the 200 world championship last year after Jones dropped out because of a back injury, has been battling with Jones since the two were in high school in southern California a decade ago.

Miller ranks second in the world in both the 100 and 200, and has been considered one of the biggest roadblocks to Jones sweeping those events.

The injury to Miller was the latest blow to a U.S. track team that had already lost two other athletes with strong possibilities of earning medals in Sydney.

C.J. Hunter, world champion in the shot put and Jones' husband, is out following arthroscopic knee surgery. Regina Jacobs, among the favorites in the women's 1,500, had to withdraw because of a respiratory ailment.