BERLIN, Conn. (AP) — Starting with a worm wiggling across a screen, a dozen children learned how to create their own stop-motion movies telling tales like a pirate ship crossing the desert.

"I just enjoy being able to put Legos together in a cool way," said Mya Lamoureux, 10, who made her movie about two mariners trying to keep their rowboat from filling with water. "I also enjoy being able to use the Legos to make a movie to show people."

To make their movies, the children carefully moved the Legos, taking photos of each tiny change.

"Now this part is going to be tricky," said Griswold Elementary School Library Media Specialist Danielle Salina, who teaches the class at the Berlin-Peck Memorial Library.

She showed the children how to stack and unstack the blocks so it appeared they were moving on their own.

"Look at this, you guys don't even need me," she said.

The Thursday morning library offering presents obstacles to children.

"We want our students to be able to try new things and persevere through them," Salina said. "We really want them to figure things out on their own."

Stop-motion lessons have been incorporated into the curriculum for the town's fifth graders for the upcoming school year, she said, after it was tried out for the first time at Griswold last year. In school, students write out a plot for their movies before learning how to use the software and newfound knowledge.

"They really love the story-telling aspect," she said.

"I thought it was very cool," said Miles Love, a Florida resident who is visiting family and created a video of windows opening and closing with his daughter. "I didn't think it would come out as well as it did."

Love said the project taught children about technology and was fun.

"Even 53-year-olds had fun," he said.

___

Online: https://bit.ly/2LNG0R6

___

Information from: Record-Journal, http://www.record-journal.com