NEW YORK (AP) _ They had rough sailing after they nearly ran out of food. But sailors from the former Soviet Union were awash with the crowd's good will during Saturday's international parade of tall ships.

''Bravo 3/8'' shouted Kris Mead, 42, of Newport, R.I., waving as sailors from Russia, Ukraine, Latvia and Estonia passed by the Intrepid, an aircraft carrier-turned-museum, during Operation Sail. The sailors, in turn, applauded crowds along the shore.

The four ships had nearly run out off food by the time they reached Puerto Rico, enroute to New York, to join the armada of 31 tall ships that sailed up the Hudson River as part of the weekend's Columbus Quincentennial celebration.

The Red Cross in Puerto Rico supplied each ship with some food, said Rich Perelman, spokesman for the celebration.

In the United States, the Kruzenstern, from Estonia, benefited from a food drive after its captain, Gennady Kolomensky, said he didn't have enough to make it home. Donations included bread from a bakery, 9,000 pounds of potatoes, and beer from the crews of other boats.

Samaritans here also donated supplies to its sister ship, the Sedov.

About 500 people, aware of the sailors' ordeal, watched from the Intrepid, a mothballed carrier that saw epic battles during World War II and survived an attack by a kamikaze pilot.

''Let's give them a hand 3/8'' said the master of ceremonies, as sailors waved from the Mir, a Russian boat.

''We have so much here,'' said Mead. ''I don't think people understand the depth of suffering elsewhere in the world.''

''Making it here was really a victory.''