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BC-OH--Ohio News Digest 2 pm, OH

March 19, 2019

Good afternoon. Here’s a look at how AP’s general news coverage is shaping up in Ohio. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP Columbus bureau at 614-885-2727 or APColumbus@ap.org. Lisa Cornwell is on the desk. Interim AP Ohio news editor Andrew Welsh-Huggins can be reached at 800-762-4841 or 614-885-2727 or awelsh@ap.org.

A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates. For up-to-the minute information on AP’s coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

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TOP STORIES:

CUYAHOGA RIVER-FISH

COLUMBUS _ Federal environmental regulators say fish living in an Ohio river that became synonymous with industrial pollution when it caught fire in 1969 are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as an example of the progress than can be achieved by investing in water quality. The state says removing fish consumption restrictions moves Ohio closer to its goal of delisting the river altogether as an area of concern. By Julie Carr Smyth. SENT: 370 words, photos.

SCI--RECORD-BREAKING HEAT

UNDATED _ Over the past 20 years, there’ve been more record-breaking hot days than there’ve been record-breaking cold days, which scientists say is an indication of global warming. Data show that since 1999, there’ve been two warm records set or broken for every cold one. In a stable climate, the numbers should be roughly equal. The Associated Press analyzed the data from hundreds of weather stations in the Lower 48 states. By Seth Borenstein and Nicky Forster. SENT: 910 words, photos, video.

BRIEFS:

_ POLICE SHOOTING-MAN KILLED: Police say a “highly agitated” man suspected of trying to break into an apartment in Mansfield has been shot and killed in a confrontation with officers.

_ GAS TAX-OHIO: An Ohio Senate committee has proposed changes to the state transportation budget bill including reducing fees on electric and hybrid vehicles, while leaving the House’s proposed gas-tax increase in the bill for now.

_ FIREFIGHTER DIES-REVIEW: The Hamilton Fire Department chief says the department has made significant changes to officer training, ground communications and fire drills in response to a firefighter’s death.

_ UNIVERSITY OF AKRON-HOTEL DEVELOPMENT: Developers in Ohio are looking to transform an old building on the University of Akron campus into a boutique hotel.

_ EARNS-DSW: DSW Inc. (DSW) on Tuesday reported a fiscal fourth-quarter loss of $45.7 million, after the Columbus-based company reported a profit in the same period a year earlier.

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SPORTS:

BBO--VOICES OF THE GAME

More than in any other sport, baseball broadcasters become an inseparable part of the game. Their voices are the backdrop to all those warm summer nights. Their distinctive calls are part of the game’s lore. Fans visualize the action through their stories and descriptions. Baseball is losing two of its voices after this season when the Reds’ Marty Brennaman and the Pirates’ Steve Blass retire. By Joe Kay. SENT: 1,070 words, photos.

BBN--REDS-WOOD

GOODYEAR, Ariz. _ The Cincinnati Reds expect left-hander Alex Wood to open the season on the injured list as he recovers from a sore back that has limited him during spring training. Wood was part of the trade that brought outfielders Yasiel Puig and Matt Kemp to Cincinnati from the Los Angeles Dodgers. By Gary Schatz. SENT: 310 words.

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If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to APColumbus@ap.org. If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.