The Democratic National Committee announced plans Friday to return 124 more inappropriate donations, from 77 people, totaling almost $1.5 million. Among them:

_$320,000 raised or contributed by Charlie Trie, a Chinese-American who owned a Little Rock, Ark., restaurant that Clinton frequented as governor. Last year, Clinton's legal defense fund rejected or returned more than $600,000 delivered by Trie because of questions about its origin. Another fund-raiser in the controversy, John Huang, also had a hand in some of the money raised by Trie.

_$366,000 from Johnny Chung, a Taiwanese-American entrepreneur who brought six Chinese government officials to a presidential radio address in 1995. The National Security Council later questioned his motives.

_$143,000 from Farhad Azima, a native of Iran whose aircraft leasing company was linked to the Iran-contra scandal. Of that amount, $54,241 was for in-kind contributions, mostly the use of his Kansas City-based company's jets. The DNC said the contributions were ``deemed inappropriate'' but would not elaborate.

_$64,050 from a fund-raiser at the Hsi Lai temple in Hacienda Heights, Calif., attended by Vice President Al Gore. Gore later said it was a mistake to hold a fund-raiser at a tax-exempt religious organization. But the DNC is returning only 44 percent of the money raised there _ contributions that might have been funneled from someone other than the donor named or where the donor wasn't a legal resident.

_$50,000 in contributions ``deemed inappropriate'' from Empire Sanitary Landfill near Scranton, Pa. There was no answer at the company's office Friday.

_A reporter tried to contact a number of the donors whose contributions were being returned. But there were no telephone listings for Interactive Wireless of Edgewater, N.J., and Royal Industries of Grapevine, Texas. The DNC said it had deemed inappropriate the $46,750 donation by Interactive Wireless and had insufficient information on the $25,000 donation from Royal Industries. The DNC had previously returned a $50,000 contribution from Interactive Wireless.