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Letters To The Editor 7/10/2018

July 10, 2018

Democracy waning

Editor: A great fear is that this dark hour in the life of our nation won’t pass, but will continue. Our history as a democratic republic may be but a memory.

Some of the best political writers and commentators believe that Trumpism is here to stay. We may have lost the fervor necessary to maintain a free society. The process began when people stopped observing and thinking for themselves, to then raise up a leader to think and do for them.

“It somehow sounds like an expose´ of the years 1933-1945 in Germany,” Lutheran Pastor R. Ray Evelan wrote in 1971.

President Abraham Lincoln has been credited with introducing the term, “United States of America,” in his Gettysburg Address. Previously the term was “these United States. . . ” so note the different connotation. We as a nation would eschew the Confederacy, which was selfish, self-centered and self-serving. Patriotic resilience came to the fore.

U.S. citizens need to recognize how far we have fallen.

During the Watergate hearings 45 years ago, leaders in the House and Senate judiciary committees stood tall. A climax to the proceedings would be the eventual movement for impeachment. Reading the danger to the stability to our system of government, three Republican stalwarts in Congress went to President Richard Nixon. They were Sens. Barry Goldwater of Arizona and Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania, along with House Minority Leader John Jacob Rhodes. They helped persuade the president to resign, thus avoiding a constitutional crisis. That was in August of 1974 and stands as a highlight in the history of representative government.

An unconscionable moment occurred in August of 2016, when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell related, “One of my proudest moments was when I looked (President) Barack Obama in the eye and said, ‘Mr. President, you will not fill the Supreme Court vacancy.’ ”

RICHARD J. YOST

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP.

Giving voice to haters

Editor: People in our country seem to be at war with each other.

What has happened to these immigrant children who were separated from their parents is called kidnapping. Lock up white nationalists instead. Our country should be better than this.

President Trump gives voice to the haters and for what? There’s plenty of resources for everyone, except Trump wants to be the supreme leader.

As for the religious right, if you’re going to be pro-life, it should be about all life. You can’t be selective. How dare members of the religious right think it is OK to cage innocent children. Democrats care about all life.

We have a war between good and evil. You cannot have a country without rules, sanity or compromise for all people. Trump is not for all Americans. He is for himself.

SHARON JAVID

OLYPHANT

 

Protect Postal Service

Editor: The way Americans communicate has changed forever.

Letter writing has mostly been replace by email. With e-commerce, the number of packages has increased dramatically.

President Trump would like to privatize the U.S. Postal Service. So-called “advantages” include greater freedom to raise prices and cutting costs by delivering fewer days per week and to more centralized locations.

Does either of these reasons sound good? It would end regular mail service at affordable prices, especially for rural areas. What exactly is meant by delivering to “centralized locations”? Would that eliminate the door-to-door delivery we’ve come to expect?

Here is something to think about: Not a single taxpayer dollar goes to Postal Service. The service’s operating budget is 100 percent from postal revenue. It is misleading to say that reorganizing the service would trim the size of the federal government, as some would like you to believe.

The Postal Service was profitable until 2006, when Congress mandated that the agency prefund retiree benefits, decades in advance. This burden is not required of any other agency. Since that time, 84 percent of all Postal Service debt has come from this unfair mandate.

In recent Gallup and Pew Research Center surveys, the Postal Service enjoys the highest level of satisfaction and trust of any government service or agency. Which special interests would benefit from privatizing a right guaranteed by our Constitution? It would not be the public. Follow the money.

SALLY FISCHBECK

CLIFFORD,

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY

 

Less than ship shape

Editor: According to a column by conservative Pat Buchanan, starting in about 2009 the U.S. Naval Academy lowered its enrollment standards for incoming freshmen so the Navy could increase racial diversity.

The academy is on a campaign to increase minority naval officers to approximate the nonwhite enlisted percentage of the Navy fleet, which consists of 40 percent minority personnel. Unfortunately, the academy allegedly turns away applicants with SAT scores above 600 and who earned good grades in their high school courses in favor of students with SAT scores in the 500s and C grades. Minority students with SATs in the 300s and 400s and C and D grades reportedly are admitted to the academy after attending a year of preparatory school.

These future officers will be in charge of operating complex naval weapons systems and making critical decisions impacting the security of our country. Don’t we want the most intelligent and able naval officers filling these highly responsible positions in the fleet?

As a former Navy enlisted man and officer, I am concerned about our Navy’s ability to conduct operations that project U.S. sea power in the world. Our Navy must right itself.

DONALD MOSKOWITZ

LONDONDERRY,

NEW HAMPSHIRE

 

Community pillar gone

Editor: Jeanne Bovard, who died July 2, was truly an outstanding human being.

She was a community leader who made a real difference in the lives of many children and adults. She saw a need and pursued it toward a resolution.

Jeanne achieved many goals yet downplayed the publicity that was given to her. She did not need to have her photo in newspapers or receive other exposure, but preferred to labor quietly without fanfare. She was a true professional and a role model — a real lady.

Thanks to Jeanne for all that she did and for being a friend to so many. Rest in everlasting peace, we love her and will miss her.

PAUL EWASKO

GLENBURN TWP.

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