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The Latest: NC judges weigh if agency heads need approval

October 2, 2018
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FILE - In this May 9, 2017 file photo, North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper makes remarks during a news conference at Credit Suisse in Morrisville, N.C. North Carolina's highest court will decide whether legislators can reject a governor's choices for important jobs like collecting taxes or registering automobiles. The state Supreme Court hears oral arguments Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018, into whether a law passed by the Republican-led legislature in 2016 unconstitutionally interfered with Democratic Gov. Cooper's ability to choose the deputies helping him do his job ensuring that laws are carried out. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on the North Carolina Supreme Court deciding the constitutionality of a state law allowing legislators to reject a governor’s agency heads (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

North Carolina’s highest court is deciding whether legislators can claim for themselves the right to reject a governor’s choices for top jobs like collecting taxes or registering automobiles.

The state Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday into whether a law unconstitutionally limits which top aides a governor can appoint. The Republican-led legislature passed the law in 2016, weeks after Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper defeated former GOP Gov. Pat McCrory.

Lawyers defending the law say it doesn’t violate the separation of powers principle because legislators who create agencies have a right to advise who runs them. Attorney Martin Warf says Cooper’s eight top aides were all approved last year, so the high court should dismiss the governor’s argument that the law can limit his choices.

A decision is expected within months.

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12:30 a.m.

North Carolina’s highest court will decide whether legislators can reject a governor’s choices for important jobs like collecting taxes or registering automobiles.

The state Supreme Court hears oral arguments Tuesday into whether a law unconstitutionally limits which top aides carry out the governor’s plans.

The Republican-led legislature passed the law in 2016, weeks after Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper defeated former GOP Gov. Pat McCrory.

Cooper’s lawyers agree the General Assembly can shape state agencies Cooper oversees, but possibly vetoing his management choices interferes with how the governor carries out duties.

Lawyers defending the law say it doesn’t violate the separation of powers principle because legislators who create agencies have a right to advise who runs them. Legislative lawyers say the governor can still supervise and remove the appointees.

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