AP NEWS

Today in Arizona History

May 1, 2019

PHOENIX (AP) — Sunday, May 5

On this date in 1910, Tucson citizens celebrated the opening of the Tucson-West Coast of Mexico Railroad.

On this date in 1917, the state legislature appropriated funds to purchase the old governor’s mansion at Prescott with the provision that the property should be used as a museum.

On this date in 1929, a company with main offices is Tulsa, Oklahoma, took over 79 mining claims in Chloride, Arizona. The combined mining claims had a shipping record of over a million dollars in copper, silver, lead and gold.

Monday, May 6

On this date in 1896, the Bisbee Daily Review newspaper was established.

On this date in 1903, President Theodore Roosevelt made his first trip to the Grand Canyon.

On this date in 1908, the federal government ordered all river steamers to be equipped with fog bells, including those that travel on the Colorado River where there are no fogs. River Capt. Jack Mellon said the order would be followed, but said, “it’s a good deal like ordering snow plows attached to all trains on the Yuma-Tucson” division of the Southern Pacific.

On this date in 1909, Richard Sloan, Arizona Supreme Court Justice, became the last Territorial Governor.

Tuesday, May 7

On this date in 1872, the first lawyers were admitted to practice law in Maricopa County.

On this date in 1913, Fred Maish, once a mayor of Tucson and wealthy cattleman of the Maish and Driscoll Cattle Co., died alone in an old adobe shack in Tucson at nearly 80 years of age.

On this date in 1916, the Yuma Game Warden reported that civil war in Mexico was scaring big game across the international line into the Yuma and Mohave Mountains.

Wednesday, May 8

On this date in 1913, U.S. deputy marshals captured a Curtiss biplane which was being shipped from Tucson to Nogales in five wooden crates loaded on a flatbed wagon. The owners of the plane claimed they intended to use it for experimental purposes, but U.S. officials suspected it was being smuggled into Mexico to aid the Sonoran troops in the revolution against the Mexican government.

On this date in 1920, a huge supply of machine gun ammunition intended for Mexican Revolutionists was shipped from Tucson to Nogales in coffins, but the shipment was tracked to an undertaking parlor and seized by the U.S. Marshals Service.

On this date in 1929, the town of Buckeye was incorporated. It had originally been called Sidney, but the name was changed to Buckeye because most of the early settlers came from Ohio.

On this date in 1929, Constable Pickens of Mesa demonstrated a high degree of civic pride when he testified in a court case that Mesa moonshine whiskey was of much better quality than that of Gilbert.

On this date in 1950, Alexander John Chandler, the first veterinary surgeon for the territory of Arizona and the man for whom the city of Chandler is named, died.

On this date in 2013, a jury finds Jodi Arias guilty of first degree-murder in the 2008 killing of Travis Alexander at his suburban Phoenix home.

Thursday, May 9

On this date in 1540, Captain Juan Hernando de Alarcon left Acapulco, Mexico to sail north until he reached the headwaters of the Gulf of California, thus becoming the first white man to explore beyond the mouth of the Colorado River.

On this date in 1869, Camp Hualapai was established as Camp Toll Gate. The camp was established in the Aztec Mountains overlooking Walnut Creek. The name was changed to Camp Hualapai on October 4, 1870. The post was abandoned on July 31, 1873.

On this date in 1884, a powder magazine on the outskirts of Phoenix exploded, shattering windows throughout the town.

On this date in 1922, the last federal troops left Fort Apache just as the first Lutheran mission was dedicated there with the baptism of 100 Apaches.

Friday, May 10

On this date in 1863, the Pioneer Mining District on Lynx Creek was formed after five members of the party led by Captain Joseph Walker discovered gold along Lynx Creek.

On this date in 1872, the Tully-Ochoa wagon train was attacked in Canyon del Oro by 300 Indians. Five men were killed and many more wounded, mules were stolen and the wagons burned.

On this date in 1913, the town of Miami was barely saved from total disaster when a fire — started in the Arizona Eastern freight depot — destroyed the A.E. station, a warehouse and several freight cars, and damaged hotels and residences in the area.

On this date in 1928, the University of Arizona Dean of Women decided that women must wear stockings, and could not appear on campus in abbreviated costumes.

Saturday, May 11

On this date in 1889, a band of masked men ambushed Major J.W. Wham and his military escort carrying a $26,000 army payroll to Fort Thomas. The payroll was stolen and eight soldiers were wounded.

On this date in 1910, the Maricopa-Phoenix train was held up about 8 miles (13 kilometers) from Maricopa. Two bandits relieved all the passengers of their valuables and one passenger was struck over the head with a revolver.

On this date in 1910, work began on the north-south territorial highway out of Prescott.

On this date in 1934, Tucson’s first city hall building, which was built in 1881, was destroyed by fire.