NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on New York's Democratic primary (all times local):

6:45 p.m.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist and actress Cynthia Nixon are making their final pitches as their closely watched and sometimes nasty Democratic primary contest comes to a close.

Cuomo spoke to reporters after casting his own ballot in Westchester County on Thursday, saying he's the best-qualified candidate not only to govern but also to push back against President Donald Trump.

Nixon cast her ballot in Manhattan and greeted subway riders. The activist and former "Sex and the City" star has faulted Cuomo's handling of the city's aging subways and says he isn't a true liberal.

Democratic primary voters will also choose candidates for attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's final primary before Election Day.

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12:45 p.m.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist actress Cynthia Nixon have cast their votes in New York's Democratic primary election.

Nixon posed for photos with supporters in Manhattan's Union Square before she voted Thursday at a community center. Cuomo appeared at a polling station in suburban Mount Kisco with his girlfriend, Sandra Lee.

Democrats across New York are also choosing their candidates for attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's last primary election of 2018.

The most-watched race is the fiercely fought contest between Cuomo and Nixon.

She's a high-profile example of an insurgent left-wing trying to oust establishment incumbents.

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11 a.m.

Democrats across New York are choosing their candidates for governor, attorney general and the state Legislature in the nation's last primary election of 2018.

The most-watched race is a fiercely fought contest between Gov. Andrew Cuomo and activist actress Cynthia Nixon.

She's a high-profile example of an insurgent left-wing trying to oust establishment incumbents.

President Donald Trump might want to keep an eye on the attorney general primary.

Fordham law professor Zephyr Teachout, New York City Public Advocate Letitia James, U.S. Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney and former Hillary Clinton adviser Leecia Eve have all vowed to be a legal thorn in the Republican president's side.

Polls show that race very close going into election day.

Voting began in some cities early Thursday and starts in other places at noon.