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The Latest: Kentucky lawmakers wrap up special session

July 24, 2019

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Latest on Kentucky lawmakers passing a pension bill in a special session (all times local):

3:05 p.m.

Kentucky lawmakers have ended their midsummer special session after wrapping up work on a pension-relief measure.

The House and Senate officially concluded the session after Gov. Matt Bevin signed the pension measure into law on Wednesday. The Republican-dominated Senate sent the bill to the GOP governor in a final vote earlier in the day.

Bevin called lawmakers into a special session last Friday to take up his pension proposal to relieve regional universities and quasi-governmental entities from massive hikes in pension costs. Those agencies include public health departments and domestic violence shelters.

A special session costs taxpayers about $66,000 per day.

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2:15 p.m.

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin has signed into law a pension bill aimed at relieving regional universities and community social services agencies from crushing retirement costs.

The signing ceremony on Wednesday came a couple of hours after the bill won final passage in the Senate. Bevin was joined by lawmakers and stakeholder groups at the signing.

The Republican governor called lawmakers into a special session last Friday to take up his pension proposal. The bill — reflecting Bevin’s plan — narrowly passed the GOP-led House on Monday and won overwhelming support in the Republican-dominated Senate.

The bill aims to relieve regional universities and quasi-governmental entities from massive increases in pension costs.

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11:55 a.m.

Kentucky lawmakers have given final approval to a pension-relief bill and sent it to Gov. Matt Bevin.

The Senate voted 27-11 Wednesday to pass the bill on the final day of a special session that began last Friday. A special legislative session costs taxpayers about $66,000 per day.

Bevin called lawmakers into session to take up his proposal to give relief to regional universities and quasi-governmental entities hit by massive increases in retirement costs. The agencies provide crucial safety-net services and include public health departments, community mental health centers and domestic violence shelters.

The measure headed to the Republican governor replaces a similar bill that Bevin vetoed in April after lawmakers had ended their regular session.

Opponents of the replacement bill warn that it’s likely to draw a court challenge.

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