CARSON, Calif. (AP) _ It may not be hog heaven, but a new home in the bucolic mountain town of Ojai is a big improvement for Grunt the pig, who was facing the prospect of becoming bacon only a week ago.

The estimated 1,000-pound animal, whose plight touched people across the country, is to be sent to a ranch where it is hoped he'll live high on the hog.

''This place that was arranged through the Fund for Animals sounds like a perfect location, with other animals there like donkeys, geese, all kinds of other animals,'' said Los Angeles County Animal Control spokeswoman Gail Christensen on Wednesday. ''It sounds like a real good life to me.''

But the wife of Grunt's new owner sounded a bit, well, disgruntled.

''Seems to be any animal in the country who's not wanted by somebody, guess who gets it,'' said Rhonda Osborn.

Mrs. Osborn's contractor husband, Ozzie, was selected from more than 300 people across the nation who offered to give Grunt a new place to wallow.

The porcine plight began when Grunt was abandoned by his owners, who moved from their home in affluent Rolling Hills Estates. They gave their gardener permission to butcher him, but the 4-foot-tall hog was rescued by animal control officials when his terrified squeals alerted neighbors.

Meanwhile, officials say Grunt seems to be reveling in all the attention.

''He seems to be happy about it,'' said Animal Control Officer Leslie Mitchell. ''In fact, he seems to be a big ham about it.''

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DENVER (AP) - Plane painters got to cut loose with a million-dollar corporate jet, decorating it with a menacing shark's jaw on the nose, gang- like logos in bright colors on its fuselage, in a job that was anything but plain.

But the paint job - including one graffito tag saying, ''Elvis on board'' - was temporary.

Kerry McPherson, director of marketing for the Englewood-based International Jet Aviation Services, said painting was a chance to display the company's nonconformity.

''It was our chance to be irreverent,'' he said. ''We treat these planes with such kid gloves all the time, polishing, cleaning and maintaining them like gems. We were having fun.''

The six-passenger jet had reached 20 years of age and 12,000 air hours, a point in which the Federal Aviation Administration requires a complete dismantling and overhaul of an aircraft's engine, electronic and navigational systems. Part of that overhaul includes a new paint job, officials said.

Before the jet was flown to Tucson, Ariz., where the exterior is to be stripped and repainted in a respectable white-on-blue with red and gray stripes, the company decided the have a little fun.

''We figured it was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to graffiti something that's worth over $1 million and still not get in trouble for it,'' said Doug Strangfeld, the firm's maintenance director.

The paint job at Centennial Airport, south of the Denver metropolitan area, pleased officials so much they flew to Stapleton International Airport and left it on the runway for a few hours to attract gawkers and amateur photographers.

The $350,000 overhaul, ordered by International Jet official Bill Milam, is a four-week operation.