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BC-MI--Michigan Weekend Exchange Digest, MI

February 20, 2019

AP-Michigan stories for Feb. 24-25. Members using Exchange stories should retain bylines and newspaper credit lines. If you have questions, please contact the desk at (313) 259-0650.

For Sunday, Feb. 24, and thereafter.

EXCHANGE-HELPING HOMELESS WOMEN

LANSING, Mich. _ Women who have ever asked, “Do you have a tampon?” in a hushed tone will understand. There’s a sisterhood that sends even strangers to the rescue, digging into the bottom of their purses. By Judy Putnam, Lansing State Journal. Four years ago, a pair of Lansing-area friends tapped that universal bond to launch the nonprofit Helping Women Period. It aims to give low-income or homeless women, girls and some transgender men the products they need. By Judy Putnam, Lansing State Journal. SENT IN ADVANCE: 773 words.

EXCHANGE-PIANIST-FINGER LOST

INTERLOCHEN, Mich. _ Michael Coonrod’s just glad it wasn’t his thumb. The seasoned pianist and Interlochen Center for the Arts instructor’s career hit a bump in May 2015 when he lost a finger — the fourth digit of his right hand — in a hiking accident. It hasn’t kept his remaining nine off the black and white keys, though. By Brooke Kansier, Traverse City Record-Eagle. SENT IN ADVANCE: 789 words.

For Monday, Feb. 25, and thereafter.

EXCHANGE-WORST CASE TRAINING

BATTLE CREEK, Mich. _ Two men with guns had already shot a deputy at the front door of the Calhoun County Courthouse and were roaming the hall selecting other victims. It could have been the worst day possible inside the building, but it was a training day while the courts were closed for the President’s Day holiday. The young intruders, Cody Madsen and Garrett Brown, had been recruited to play bad guys and were armed with airsoft guns, not real rifles and handguns. By Trace Christenson, Battle Creek Enquirer. SENT IN ADVANCE: 735 words.

EXCHANGE-WIN BY PIN

LIVINGSTON, Mich. _ Kanton DeClercq was helped out of his wheelchair and taken to the circle in the center of the wrestling mat. When the referee’s whistle blew, the fifth-grader from Tecumseh was no longer bound by cerebral palsy, a disease he’s had since birth. DeClercq was what he always dreamed of being — a wrestler. Just like his heroes in the WWE. Just like his friends at school. By Bill Khan, Livingston Daily Press & Argus. SENT IN ADVANCE: 888 words.