PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The Latest on Gov. Paul LePage's veto of a marijuana sales bill (all times local):

3:35 p.m.

The Maine Marijuana Project is calling on lawmakers to override Republican Gov. Paul LePage's veto of a bill to regulate the sale of marijuana, likely in 2019.

LePage on Friday cited several concerns including how the Trump administration is going to treat the federal-state conflict in law.

David Boyer of the Maine Marijuana Project said the veto means marijuana will continue to be sold on an unregulated, black market unless two-thirds of lawmakers in both chambers vote to override the veto.

Meanwhile, Smart Approaches to Marijuana praised the governor for vetoing the "flawed bill." Chairman Scott Gagnon cited "gaping holes with respect to youth access and public safety."

Republican Sen. Roger Katz said the governor's criticism was too late. He said the governor should've been involved in the bi-partisan process.

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1:12 p.m.

Maine Gov. Paul LePage has vetoed a bill to regulate retail sales of marijuana.

The Republican governor says in a veto letter that he's concerned the bill conflicts with federal law. He also says it doesn't address compatibility with the medical marijuana program in the state.

Friday was the last day for LePage to veto bills to regulate the retail sale of marijuana. It's also the last day to veto a bill to delay implementation of ranked-choice voting.

The bill that sets rules and taxes on marijuana passed with a two-thirds majority in the Senate, but not in the House.

A two-thirds vote is necessary to override the veto. The legislature will return on Monday to consider the veto.

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9:52 a.m.

The Maine Legislature is set to return Monday to deal with any vetoes by Republican Gov. Paul LePage. The question now is whether there will be any vetoes.

Friday was the last day for LePage to veto bills to regulate the retail sale of marijuana and to delay implementation of ranked-choice voting.

Observers say it's unlikely he'll sign the marijuana bill into law because he has called it a gateway drug, but he said in 2014 that the choice should be left up to voters. Other options are vetoing it, or letting it become law without his signature.

The bill that sets rules and taxes on marijuana passed with a two-thirds majority in the Senate, but not in the House. A two-thirds vote is necessary to override the veto.